Category Archives: Newsletter

SCOS Update February 2019

Jobs and books this month:

 First, a lovely sounding job – deadline 17/3/19.

 Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Organization Studies

Faculty of Business & Law, Department of Business & Management

University of the West of England

 Details of post available here.  

 This item was sent in by Peter Case, who has been a long time Scosser. I’m sure he’d be happy if anyone wants to contact him to ask more about the job. UWE has a lot of Scossy people working there !

And…..

Four new PhD scholarships at the Department of Management, Society and Communication, at Copenhagen Business School: deadline 1st April.

https://www.cbs.dk/en/about-cbs/jobs-cbs/vacant-positions/4-phd-scholarships-the-department-of-management-society-and-communication?fbclid=IwAR1hECZIwlSw5Ma_IbdPxxUOJDGY84wcqzGgFHaFot0PszFtNZa0snVCVvU

Also, don’t forget to send in an abstract by 15th March if you want to come to the 5th Workshop on Leadership, Diversity and Inclusion in Copenhagen on the 13th-14th May:

 https://www.cbs.dk/en/knowledge-society/strategic-areas/business-in-society-platforms/diversity-and-difference-platform/events/5th-workshop-on-leadership-diversity-and-inclusion?fbclid=IwAR3wXpYTFVx0GMpuBJcUBO2HGgpqpQ1n7t5TP2_HWxAtoVvIuLDMjXdGurw

 And if you want to do some reading to prepare: the second edition of Heike Mensi-Klarbach and Annette Risberg’s textbook on Diversity in Organizations: Concepts and Practices has just been published:

www.macmillanihe.com

 And then there’s the second edition of Monika Kostera’s book Organize Ourselves: Inspirations and ideas for self-organization and self management published by Mayfly books.

And then there’s Management Scholarship and Organisational Change: Representing Burns and Stalker by Miriam Green and published by Routledge.

SCOS Update December 2018

 

So… we have three really important news items this month:

The first is the annual diversity workshop at Copenhagen Business School that takes place on 13-14 May next year.

Keynote speakers are Professor Jo Brewis, Open University, UK; Professor Anders Neergaard, Linköping University, Sweden; and Professor Dorthe Staunæs, Aarhus University, Denmark.

Follow this link to read the call in full and sign up.

The second is to remind you all about the deadline for our ghostly SCOS conference in York this summer! Abstracts of no more than 500 words, in pdf-format, should be submitted as e­mail attachments by Friday 21 December 2018 to: SCOS2019York@gmail.com. You may also direct any queries to this address. The main organizers are Carolyn Hunter and Lynne Baxter, and the conference will be hosted by the York Management School, University of York, UK. Okay, it is nearly the 21st …. but hurry! You might be in with a chance even if they arrive a bit late…..

And the third is nanother reminder, this one for the amazing CMS conference.…

The 2019 Critical Management Studies (CMS) conference to be held in Milton Keynes (call for papers below) and organized in collaboration with VIDA, the critical management studies association for people who identify as anything other than cis-men.  A reminder that all of the calls for papers and workshop participants for CMS 2019 are available at: http://business-school.open.ac.uk/events/11th-international-critical-management-studies-conference

If you have queries about individual streams or workshops, please contact the convenors.

General conference-related queries should be sent to OUBS-CMS2019@open.ac.uk

The deadline for all abstract submissions is 31st January 2019.

SCOS Update November 2018

Firstly, welcome to all the new members who came to Tokyo. Your names and email addresses re now on our mailing list, so unless you move and don’t tell us, (or unless you’d prefer not to be on the list, in which case do let me know….) you’ll be getting our regular-ish newsletter every month.

And on that note – apologies all; I’ve been very busy and hadn’t quite begun to think myself into the membership secretary role. I haven’t done a newsletter since September but it is now firmly in my consciousness (and diary).

So… we have three really important news items this month: the first is our 2019 conference – the theme is ‘ghosts’ and the venue is the very historical (and haunted) city of York. The call for papers is now out: see below. (I am reliably informed that the ghost of Scossy-past might also be there to haunt the conference….)

The second is the call for papers for the 2019 Critical Management Studies (CMS) conference to be held in Milton Keynes (call for papers below) and organized in collaboration with VIDA, the critical management studies association for people who identify as anything other than cis-men.  Both of these conferences re absolute musts – they are going to be really great events!

 And item three, last but not least, the SCOS board is really thrilled that Anne-marie Greene has agreed to be the next SCOS chair after Thomas steps down in July. This is really fantastic news!

 Cheers,

Christina

 

Item 1: Call for papers: the 2019 SCOS conference

We warmly invite all Scossers to write an abstract for our annual conference. The theme is ‘Ghosts’ and the conference will be held in the centre of York, the most haunted city in the UK. The call for papers is below and we hope you find it thought-provoking.  In addition to the exchange of ideas during sessions we have some special events for you planned, such as ghost tours of the city and a final dinner at the National Railway Museum where you can form your own ghost train. We’d love to see you at York, kind regards, Lynne Baxter and Carolyn Hunter.’ 

 Ghosts

York has made claims to be one of the most haunted cities in the UK and Europe, with a long history dating from medieval times and numerous ghost stories telling evocative tales of ancestors past and present. Ghost Research Foundation International (2002) labelled York the most haunted city in the world with 504 hauntings around the city. The city contains many historical locations with ghostly histories, including stories of Roman soldiers marching through the cellars of the Treasurers House and the story of Thomas Percy who staggers through the graves at Goodramgate searching for his decapitated head. We invite you to join us at SCOS 2019 in York to explore the ghostly side of organisational life.

The study of organizations by critical scholars is often driven by the feeling that more is occurring just out of sight, at the corner of our eye and veiled behind the surface. Are we being ghosted? These ghosts, of the past, present and future, make sudden and sometimes unwelcome appearances. They push us to look beyond the rational explanations of organizations to search for the emotive, affective and aesthetic sensory experiences. They play on the spiritual, although not simply in a religious sense, but also as a form of enchantment, wonder and imagination which persists in modern life (technology, bureaucracy and even commodities) despite the narrative of a disenchanted modernity (Bennett, 2001). Ghosts haunt us, frighten us and present us with those cracks where the abject seeps in, where the uncanny arises.

We ask scholars to consider their organizational ghosts: dark or light, fleeting or repetitive, veiled or signed. We invite scholars to explore the dark side of organizing: that which resides in the shadows, comes through the crack in the wall or a noise in the night. We also welcome accounts of those organizational ghosts which bring light: or open up other possibilities to us, through drawing on the past and showing the future. Ghosts may be ambivalent, such as the final spirit in the Christmas Carol. Others bring caution, like the ghost in Hamlet who heralds madness. Similarly some appear fully formed, embodied walking dead who can harm, psychological and physically; while others, like the the shapes in The Yellow Wallpaper (Gilman, 1892), are disembodied and take substance through our neurosis. 

SCOSSers have already encountered ghosts (see Pors, 2016; Beyes & Stayaert, 2013; De Cock et al, 2013; Muhr & Salem, 2013; MacAulay et al, 2010). Ghosts exist in organizational metaphors and symbolisms: we discuss ghosts in the machine in technology studies; in traces and impressions of corruption; of spirituality, superstition, intuition and gut feelings in decision making; and of invisibility and powerlessness when Othered (especially in relation to gender, sexuality and race among other identities).

However we want to extend these debates to the way in which organizations, in their processes, practices, materiality and temporality, are haunted by ghostly matters (Gordon, 1997) and are part of the organization of the ghostly. Haunting provide the instances where repressed violence emerge, those “singular yet repetitive instances where home becomes unfamiliar, where your bearings on the world lose direction, where the over-and-done-with comes alive, when what’s in your blind spot comes into view” (Gordon, 1997, xvi). Haunting represents the repetitive emergence of ghosts, potentially even forming rhythms of the organization (Lefebvre, 2004). Their reappearance may tie them to a particular space or location, forming associations through their ghostly traces. As such it would be appropriate to consider the methodological implications of ghostly matters, tracing the imprints of ghosts on organizational processes, practice and people.There is of course a significant industry focused on selling ghosts and the consumption of ghostly experiences: the pseudoscience of ghost hunting, ghost tours, and haunted houses, through to commercial blockbusters like Ghostbusters and Harry Potter. Holidays such as All Hallows eve or Halloween (US), the Mexican Day of the Dead (Mexico), the Hungry Ghost Festival (China and some parts of Asia) and Guy Fawks (UK) offer opportunities, or even the obligation, for consumers to play with their identities in adopting personas, while consuming from the vast industry of sweets and food, costumes, decorations and party items. This also includes the industry of publishing, with ghost writers working with industry leaders for their next best seller, or in academia where playing the game may include publications with ghost co-authors.

SCOS 2019 will be in York, a ghostly city. York represents how spaces, places, buildings and organizations’ may become associated with ghosts and haunted by stories and persons long since passed. Ghostliness is tied to ambiance and atmosphere, “a surrounding influence which does not quite generate its own form” (Ahmed, 2010:40) but where we still ‘pick up’ feelings. Ghosts permeate our collective memory of buildings and locations as places and spaces become known as haunted. These memories can shape and undermine us, much as the deceased Rebecca undermined the second Mrs. de Winter through her ‘presence’ (de Maurier, 1938). Ghosts impact on us, although they are also shaped by the context in which we remember them in. These apparitions bring together our material understanding of the world with the imaginary. How can we speak with these ghosts, hauntings and ghostly spaces, as researchers how do we engage with them?

This call encourages research which seeks out these ghosts, to engage, converse and if needed challenge them. Contributors may find inspiration in the following themes:

  • Ghosts, apparitions, superstition, poltergeist, spirit, souls
  • Dark side of organizations, corruption, parasitic
  • Unintended consequences, shadows and imprints
  • Clairvoyance, intuition, dreams, imagination, reality.
  • Ghost writers, ghost academics
  • Selling and commercialization of ghosts
  • Fairy tales, storytelling, morality lessons, folklore, mythology in organizational life
  • Dead, appearance of living, human and animal, necromancy
  • Corporeality, disgust, invisible bodies, disembodied experiences
  • Haunted locations and cities – organizational spaces and places; Haunted houses
  • Ghosting as a verb of organizing: To glide, hover. Alternatively: to be spooked, haunted; a ‘ghost’ trace or impression
  • Ghosting in social relationships
  • Appearing and disappearing
  • Ghosts in the machine – technology, artificial intelligence
  • Memories: shadows of the past, possibilities of the future

 

Open stream and workshops

SCOS 2019 will also have an open stream, allowing for the presentation of papers of more general interest to the SCOS community. In addition we are open to suggestions for workshops or similar events in line with the proposed theme. Outlines of workshops should be the same length as a paper abstract and should give an indication of the resources needed, the number of participants, the time required, the approach to be taken and the session’s objectives. Please identify “open stream” or “workshop” on your abstract, as appropriate.

 Submission of abstracts

Abstracts of no more than 500 words, in pdf-format, should be submitted as e­mail attachments by Friday 21 December 2018 to: SCOS2019York@gmail.com. You may also direct any queries to this address. The main organizers are Carolyn Hunter and Lynne Baxter, and the conference will be hosted by the York Management School, University of York, UK.

 References

Ahmed, S. (2010) The Promise of Happiness. Duke University Press: London

Bennett, J. (2003) The Enchantment of Modern Life. Princeton University Press: Princeton.

Beyes, T. and Steyaert, C. (2013) Strangely Familiar: The Uncanny and Unsiting Organizational Analysis, Organization Studies. 34:10, 1445 – 1465.

Cock, C., O’Doherty, D. & Rehn, A. (2013) Specters, ruins and chimeras: Management & Organizational History’s encounter with Benjamin, Management & Organizational History, 8:1, 1-9.

Gilman, S. (1892) The Yellow Wallpaper. The New England Magazine.

Gordon, A.F. (1997) Ghostly matters: Haunting and the sociological imagination.  Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Lefebvre, H. (2004) Rhythmanalysis: Space, time and everyday life. London: Bloomsbury

de Maurier, D. (1938) Rebecca. Virago Press: London.

MacAulay, K., Yue, A. & Thurlow, A. (2010) Ghosts in the Hallways: Unseen Actors and Organizational Change, Journal of Change Management, 10:4, 335-346

Muhr, S. & Salem, A. (2013) Specters of colonialism – illusionary equality and the forgetting of history in a Swedish organization, Management & Organizational History, 8:1, 62-76.

Pors. J. (2016) ‘It Sends a Cold Shiver down my Spine’: Ghostly Interruptions to Strategy Implementation, Organization Studies.  37:11, 1641–1659

 

 Item 2: CMS conference 2019: Call for papers:

The website for the CMS 2019 conference at the OU has now been updated with details of the streams. Where abstracts are requested, these need to be sent to stream convenors (all of whom specify a contact email address in their calls) by 31st January 2019.

The website is here: http://business-school.open.ac.uk/events/11th-international-critical-management-studies-conference

SCOS Update September 2018

Dear Scossers,

It was marvellous to see so many new and familiar faces in Tokyo on the theme of Wabi-Sabi! The focus on traditional Japanese aesthetics, philosophy and the tea ceremony was almost as invigorating as my first experience of matcha ice-cream! Following the many interesting papers presented at the conference, the organisers are looking forward to receiving submissions to the associated Culture and Organisation Special Issue. Scossy is also now en route to a more ambiguous and ghostly realm with next year’s conference organisers, who will host in York, UK in 2019. 

There are a few interesting items enclosed in this newsletter about forthcoming events, including details of the new SCOS Special Events Fund and requests for submissions to the SCOS book. We hope attendees appreciated the re-institution of the AGM at the conference, but for those who missed the news regarding board changes the details have been included below. Christina will be taking on the membership newsletters from now on, so please send any items or news to her for future circulation at christina.schwabenland@beds.ac.uk

 

Item 1 CfP Culture & Organisation Special Issue on Wabi-Sabi

Item 2 SCOS Special Events Fund. Initial deadline for applications: 15th October 2018

Item 3 SCOS Book Call for submissions (short papers, reflections, poetry or alternatives!) deadline: 21st December 2018

Item 4 Summary of SCOS Board info from AGM

Item 5 Call for Sub-Theme proposals @ CMS 2019 at the Open University, UK. deadline: 1st Sept 2018

Item 6 The Open University Business School, UK, has several PhD studentships available for a February 2019 start, including one co-supervised by Jo Brewis and Cinzia Priola (Department of People and Organizations).

The link is here: http://business-school.open.ac.uk/research/research-degrees/phd-studentships

Item 7 Special Issue on Circular Economy in Culture and Organization (Deadline for submissions 15 November 2018)

http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/bes/gsco-si-circular-econ-3q2017?utm_source=CPB&utm_medium=cms&utm_campaign=JMI02339

 

 

Best Wishes

Laura & Christina . ?

 

**Don’t forget that if you want to unsubscribe from the members mailing list or need to update your details, all you need to do is send a message to christina.schwabenland@beds.ac.uk stating ‘unsubscribe’ or outlining your new contact details.**

 

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Item 1 CfP Culture & Organisation Special Issue on Wabi-Sabi

 

Call for Papers: Wabi-sabi (侘寂): Imperfection, incompleteness and impermanence in organizational life

 

Volume 26, issue 3, 2020

 

Following on from the highly successful combined SCOS/ACSCOS Conference held at Meiji University in Tokyo Japan from August 17-20 2018, we welcome submissions to a Special Issue of Culture and Organization on the subject of ‘Wabi-sabi (侘寂): Imperfection, incompleteness and impermanence in organizational life’.

 

Wabi-sabi is an approach to life based on accepting the transience and imperfection of the world. As a Japanese aesthetic derived from Buddhism, wabi-sabi embraces the wisdom that comes from perceiving beauty in impermanence and incompleteness. What might the flawed, faulty, and weathered have to do with formal organisations, obsessed as they seemingly are with continually striving for perfection? Could informal and emergent organisations represent the wabi-sabi ideal? Is perfection, as an antithesis of wabi-sabi, embedded in managerial efforts such as striving for continuous improvement, setting ‘stretch’ targets, managing the performance of ideal employees, promoting organizational cultures of excellence, and even the romanticized perfect bodies of employees?  (Hardy and Thomas, 2015) Is it then the case that the managerial aesthetic of organizations is the antinomy of wabi-sabi? (Taylor, 2013).

 

The idea for this Special Issue is to explore how the wabi-sabi aesthetic can offer a counterpoint to the forms of idealization that dominate so much of managerial and organisational thinking. This is an exploration of how ideas from an ancient Eastern tradition might fruitfully be brought to bear on organisational issues, challenges and problems (Lowe, et al. 2015). Wabi-sabi as a theme explores the imperfect idea of a dividing crack between ‘the East’ and ‘the West’ that we hope the Special Issue will illuminate with the sort of effervescent creativity and fluid thinking that characterises Culture and Organization.

 

We invite submissions that consider any of the possibilities through which principles of transience and imperfection are present in, or can be made relevant to, organisational life. Central to this is how organisations have long been understood as exemplars of containment that can wilfully defy recognition of the importance of transience, flux, and fluidity. Such standpoints negate or minimise the significance of difference and undecidability leading to deleterious effects on organisational life such as overdetermined measurement systems and quality regimes. Undoing the desire for rock-solid certainty might just prove to be essential for developing ethical openness to others (Levinas, 2007; Pullen and Rhodes, 2014). Is it then possible that wabi-sabi’s emphasis on transience and imperfection offers a path appreciating ethical relations and challenging oppressive organizational regimes that violate humanity? Or could it lead to worse outcomes?

 

This Special Issue is an opportunity for scholars to engage with Asian concepts and ideas in a creative and inclusive way that has traditionally epitomised the ethos of Culture and Organization and SCOS conferences, and to carry on from a previous edition of Culture and Organization on the theme of ‘East is East’ (Vol. 21, Issue 5, 2015).  More broadly we also welcome submissions on themes to do with impermanence, imperfection and incompleteness from other philosophical traditions, where these are relevant to organisational studies. Contributors may find inspiration from the following list of potential themes:

 

• The desire for perfection in organisations, careers, and lives

• Mindfulness, organising, managing, leadership, and followership

• Western philosophy’s engagement with Eastern philosophy through, for example, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Irigaray, as well as Eastern philosophy’s engagement with Western philosophy, for example Nishida, Watsuji, and Yuasa, and its implications for organisations

• The idealization of Japanese management practice in Western management theory, in for example kanban (lean just-in-time process), jidoka (stop everything!), babyoke (automated mistake proofing) and poka yoke (mistake proofing)

• Imperfection as a new organizational ideal

• Undecideability and the ethics of not-knowing in organisational life

• Living imperfect lives at work

• Imperfection as lack, critiques of patriarchal organisation

• Western preoccupations with completeness and totality as it relates to organizational studies

• An organisational aesthetics of im/perfection and transience

• Eastern and Western ideals of beauty and cultural perfection in organizational life, for instance, gendered robots at work

• Symbols of imperfection, imperfect bodies, and the monstrous as they relate to organisational ethics and experience

• The politics and ethics of organisational failure; ugly failures and beautiful failures

• Impermanence and organising

• Global transitions and transience of workers and careers

• Simplicity and/or quietness in organizations

• Enlightenment (satori) and leadership discourse

• Desolation and solitude or liberation from the material world and the rejection of organisations

• Inspiration for wabi-sabi expressed in the arts (music, flower arrangements, gardens, poetry, food ceremonies) and organisational issues

 

This list is intended to be indicative only. Innovative interpretations of the call are encouraged.  With its long tradition of interdisciplinary approaches, C&O invites papers that draw insights and approaches from across a range of social sciences and humanities.  In addition to scholars working in management and organization studies we welcome contributions from anthropology, sociology, philosophy, politics, art history, communication, film, gender and cultural studies. We welcome papers from any disciplinary, paradigmatic or methodological perspective as long as they directly address the theme of wabi-sabi and organizational life.  

 

The Special Issue editors are Janet Sayers (Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand), Masayasu Takahashi (Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan), Masato Yotsumoto (University of Nagasaki, Sasebo, Japan), Toshio Takagi (Showa Women’s University, Tokyo, Japan),  Thomas Taro Lennerfors (Uppsala University, Sweden), and Barbara Plester (University of Auckland, New Zealand).  

 

Submission and informal enquiries

 

Please ensure that all submissions to the special issue are made via the ScholarOne Culture and Organization site at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/gsco. You will have to sign up for an account before you are able to submit a manuscript. Please ensure when you do submit that you select the relevant special issue (Volume 26, Issue 3) to direct your submission appropriately. If you experience any problems, please contact the editors of this issue.

 

Style and other instructions on manuscript preparation can be found at the journal’s website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gsco20/current. Manuscript length should not exceed 8000 words, including appendices and supporting materials. Please also be aware that any images used in your submission must be your own, or where they are not, you must already have permission to reproduce them in an academic journal. You should make this explicit in the submitted manuscript.

 

Manuscripts must be submitted by February 1st 2019.

 

Prospective authors are invited to discuss manuscript ideas for the special issue with the guest editors before the deadline for submissions.  They can be reached via e-mail at scosacscos2018@gmail.com.

 

References

 

Hardy, C. and Thomas, R. 2015. “Discourse in a Material World.” Journal of Management Studies 52: 680-696.

 

Levinas, E. 2007. “Sociality and Money.” Business Ethics: A European Review 16 (3): 203-207.

 

Lowe, S., Kainzbauer, A., Tapachai, N. & K.-S Hwang. 2015. “Ambicultural Blending Between Eastern and Western Paradigms: Fresh Perspectives for International Management Research.” Culture and Organization  21 (4): 304-320.

 

Taylor, S. 2013. “The Impoverished Aesthetic of Modern Management: Beauty and Ethics in Organisations.” Aesthetics and Business Ethics, Issues in Business Ethics Series Vl, 41: 23-35.

 

Pullen, A., & C. Rhodes. 2014. “Corporeal Ethics and the Politics of Resistance in Organizations.” Organization 21 (6): 782-796.

 

 

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Item 2 SCOS Special Events Fund. Initial deadline for applications: 15th October 2018

 

The SCOS philosophy is ‘serious fun’. Serious, because we are dedicated to the development of unusual and groundbreaking ideas in the analysis of organized life. Fun, because our members provide a continual source of enthusiasm, support and inspiration for each other. For SCOS, the social side of our activities is an essential – indeed indistinguishable – element of our intellectual and practical endeavors.

 

To encourage the development of often marginalized perspectives on organized life, and the ethico-political promises of such perspectives, the SCOS Board is delighted to offer funding for ‘special events’.  The Special Events Fund will be offered every year although the total amount disbursed will depend on the surplus available. Events should challenge and blur the boundaries of conventional thinking in keeping with the SCOS ethos of ‘serious fun’.

 

Information for Proposers

Criteria

SCOS wishes to support creative and/or innovative activities that reflect the SCOS ethos and which would struggle to be supported elsewhere. We do not wish to limit your imagination as to what forms activities should take; they could range from a workshop to the collaborative production of a film or artwork. As an example, when the Fund operated previously, it paid for a one-day workshop in Bristol where the participants made dolls in response to Hélène Cixous’s Laugh of the Medusa. Our criteria for a successful proposal are therefore:

·      The extent to which the event echoes the SCOS intellectual ethos: a critical and reflexive interest in the interlinked issues of organizational symbolism, culture and change, articulated in the broadest possible sense and informed by our commitment to unusual, inter- and trans-disciplinary understandings of organization and management explored where appropriate via innovative, qualitative research methodologies.

·      We are more likely to fund events which conventional sources (eg UK ESRC or the EU) would not fund – simply put, the more original, innovative and downright out there your event is, the better!

·      Applications should speak to the ways in which the event will be inclusive, collegial and supportive, especially of younger researchers and those from locations less well represented in our existing network.

·      Relatedly, we will assess the extent to which the funds required will be used to maximize attendance/participation, so as to potentially enlarge SCOS membership. As such it is advised that applications are specific about how the funding will do so.

·      Events which are already well supported by institutional or other sources of funding, or where other sources of funding have seemingly not been exhausted, will in all likelihood not receive SCOS special events funding.

·      We will NOT fund academic time, but practitioner time could be supported if appropriate.

·      Applications will be compared to each other and the most deserving according to these criteria will attract funds.

 

Application Process

 

•   SCOS members are invited to apply for awards in the range of £500 to £2,000 for each event.

•   The Board will consider applications twice per year at the April and November Board meetings. The deadline for the April meeting is the 15th of Marchand the deadline for the November meeting is the 15th of October.

•   Successful applicants should hold the event and spend the funds awarded within 12 months of notification of the award.

•   If an application is turned down, the applicant(s) can revise their bid and resubmit for a following deadline. We wish to encourage this as a development opportunity.

 

           

The application details required are as follows:

·      Organizers of event (names and contact details, institutional affiliation/s).

·      Host institution and/ or location of event (if different).

·      Date/s of event.

·      Description of event including number of participants, theme, whether it is intended for a specific audience (eg doctoral students, early-career researchers etc.).

·      Amount sought and reasons for seeking SCOS funding (ie, what will the money be used for?).

·      Details of any other funding that has already been secured and/ or applied for, or details of why funding from other sources is not available.

·      Explicit indication as to how the funding sought will benefit SCOS in terms of encouraging attendance from doctoral students, early career researchers and those from locations less well represented in our existing network, so as potentially to enlarge our membership in future.

·      An indication of how the event relates to the intellectual activities of SCOS.

·      Applications should be no more than 500 words long. The Board will only consider one application per event.

 

Please email applications to Thomas Lennerfors, Chair of SCOS at lennerfors@gmail.com. Any queries can also be sent to this address. Applicants will be informed of the results within two weeks of each meeting, unless further details are required by the Board in order to reach a final decision. Successful applicants are required to use SCOS branding, which will be supplied, and prepare a report/account to be used in SCOS media promotion.

 

We look forward very much to receiving your applications.

 

Warmest wishes,

 

THE SCOS BOARD

 

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Item 3 Call for member Contributions to the SCOS book

 

After several years of SCOSsy soul-searching, Thomas and the rest of the board have collected a range of submissions and materials on the past(s), present(s), and future(s) of SCOS. These curated materials will form the basis of a book to be launched at the York conference. While many notable (even infamous?) scossers such as Antonio Strati, Silvia Gherardi, Jo Brewis, Alf Rehn, Peter Case, Monika Kostera, et al. have contributed, we would love to receive further submissions from members. Why not explore your embodied experiences to tell us about SCOS possibilities, your memories of the history of ACSCOS, or imagination about the future of JSCOS? 

Open for a range of contributions, reflective pieces, normative ideas, manifestos, art, poetry, photos, theoretical musings, we would love to hear from you. Submissions need not be onerous or lengthy SCOS-crocodiles, usually a written contribution is about 2-5 A4 pages. In our most delightful dreams we hope for anything on topics as diverse as:

•   The meaning of SCOSsy knowledge

•   Imaginings of a SCOS community

•   Visions of a Dragon

•   The Invisible life/lives of scholarship

•   Research passions

•   Intellectual misfits and scholarly homes

•   Academic Arts

•   Fun, flippancy and functionalism

•   Potential and limitations of metaphorical studies

To discuss an idea, contact Thomas on lennerfors@gmail.com or Laura on laura.mitchell.ac.uk@gmail.com. The deadline for contributions is 21st December 2018.

 

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Item 4  Summary of SCOS Board info from AGM

 

At the conference in Tokyo we presented a brief summary of the roles of the board positions and who was in them, as well as some up to date information about what different people are doing. The list of board members can be found on the website here: http://www.scos.org/scos-board/

The constitution is linked on the same page and this outlines the roles to some degree. The board generally meet three times a year (once at the conference) and aim to facilitate the running of SCOS, keeping members informed, and promoting conference organising. 

SCOS acquires money from a levy included in conference fees/donations and spends money on the journal subscriptions for members and bursaries for student conference attendance plus refreshments for board meetings and small gifts for conference organisers. At present a surplus is funding the special events fund. The website has been re-vamped recently and Scott along with the new social media officers Bob and Caroline would love to feature news and articles from members so don’t hesitate to get in touch with any content you would be happy to share!

 

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Item 5

The 11th International Critical Management Conference

 

PRECARIOUS PRESENTS, OPEN FUTURES

The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK

27th – 29th June 2019

 

CALL FOR SUB-THEME PROPOSALS

 

The Department for People and Organisations at the Open University Business School, in collaboration with VIDA, the Critical Management Studies Association, will host the International CMS conference in 2019 around the theme of ‘Precarious Presents, Open Futures’. This theme invites theoretical and empirical analysis of what it means for societies and organizations to be ‘open’ in the 21st century, what currently constitutes radical political, economic, cultural, historical and ethical openness, and how this openness is under attack from renewed discourses of individualized privilege and closure as well as physical violence.

                                                                                       

It was once claimed that the new millennium would mark the ‘end of history’, characterized by the permanent victory of the free market and liberal democracy anticipated by neo-liberalism. Yet these triumphant visions have been profoundly challenged by the global financial crisis and the growing populist demand for radical change across the ideological spectrum. Rising inequality and the growth of the precarious economy, marked by zero hour contracts and other unstable and insecure working arrangements, have meant that for many, modern working life is tainted by material insecurity and psychological anxiety. Faith in democracy is being abused by the spread of oligarchy and the troubling return of nativism, racism and nationalism. Our identities are threatened in a present where personal data are routinely harvested and exploited, as exemplified by many recent scandals. And all of these concerns are exacerbated by fear of a hi-tech, automated, dystopian future of mass unemployment. 

 

Still, these uncertainties may also prove to be the catalyst for creating new opportunities to profoundly reshape and reorganize our economies, politics and societies. Neoliberalist assumptions, once held sacred, are now threatened by new ideas, such as a universal basic income, while seemingly entrenched elites may be at risk. ‘Industry 4.0’ – a potentially unholy mix of the Internet of Things, cloud computing, artificial intelligence and cyber-physical systems, predicted to revolutionize manufacturing – is a very daunting possibility. However, it might be supplemented, dramatically transformed, even supplanted by ideas of ‘democracy 4.0’ and ‘development 4.0’. Perhaps we can reimagine contemporary management thinking and organizations so that they are as radically ‘empowering’ as they are ‘smart’, challenging dominant interwoven paradigms based on patriarchy, racism, ethnic discrimination, ageism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism and colonialism. 

 

For these reasons, it is more urgent than ever to ask: who is influencing these new histories and how do, and can, critical management academics participate in them? How can they be further democratized and owned by the many rather than the elite few, the 99% and not the 1%? In the western world, developments like the election of Donald Trump, Brexit, and Theresa May’s ‘confidence and supply’ agreement with the Irish Democratic Unionist Party reveal a distinct politics of closure and exclusion in regard to geographic borders, ‘facts’ and hard-won progress around expanding social inclusion. On the other hand, in the southern hemisphere the election of Jacinda Ardern, a committed feminist who is passionate about the eradication of child poverty and homelessness, calls for a questioning of taken for granted, western-centric approaches to politics as well as an amplification of New Zealand’s voice on the global stage.  

 

At stake, then, is a resurgent need to radically reconceive the meanings and practices associated with openness. It is also vital that we critically assess how and in what ways they might actually be(come) open, rather than simply giving the appearance of openness. Open source creation, collaboration and information are recalibrating the potential for personal and collective interactions and knowledge sharing across the globe. In short, then, how can participants in CMS contribute to transforming our precarious presents into possibilities for genuinely open futures?

 

For the 2019 conference, we therefore invite stream and workshop proposals from diverse disciplines as well as interdisciplinary proposals which critically unpack new concepts including – but not limited to – digital inclusion, decolonizing data management, trans-human management, alternative human-animal relations, opensource organizations, virtual progress, global solidarity and mobile organizing. These concepts (and many others) allow for an exploration of how technologies and emerging forms of organization can subvert established identities, and open the space for new and marginalized voices to shape our presents and futures. We are also interested in proposals, again from diverse disciplines within and without the field of management studies, that engage with the contemporary production and organization of knowledge – specifically its openness to alternative perspectives and traditionally marginalized voices – as well as how emerging techniques and technologies associated with ‘open information’ are reinforcing old or fostering new forms of ideological and social closure.  Proposals which engage with the broader sociopolitical, economic and technological changes outlined above and how CMS can respond to them in order to help shape more open societies are equally welcome. These would require reflection on our own role as researchers, educators and intellectual activists, as well as the (changing) role of universities in producing both closures and openness in the contemporary context. Just as importantly, we are committed to ‘opening up’ how a conference is organized and managed, creating collaborative spaces for constructive knowledge sharing between academics, activists, practitioners, artists and policy makers, inter alia. These could include activist-led ‘unstreams’ or ‘noworkshops’, performances, art sharing sessions and interactive installations involving virtual technology and mobile games.

 

Proposals should include an outline of the proposed sub-theme (500-750 words), as well as a short description of the team of convenors, including their backgrounds and experience. Ideally, convenors for streams will be drawn from different continents and disciplines, and be gender-balanced. We would also like to encourage the inclusion of early-career academics and Doctoral students as part of convener teams. We expect most of the submissions to be linked with the overall conference theme, but other submissions are welcome as long as they are likely to appeal to the wider CMS community and beyond. We are keen to encourage proposals from the range of management studies disciplines (accounting and finance, human resource management, industrial relations, marketing and consumption, organization studies, international business, etc.) and related disciplines including – but not limited to – sociology, human geography, cultural studies, anthropology and psychology. Cross-/multi-/interdisciplinary proposals are very much encouraged.

 

Please note that we will apply the principle of progressive stacking in the event that we receive more proposals than we can accommodate for the conference. This approach means that convenor teams including members of non-dominant gender, racial, ethnic, sexual, age, ability and regional groupings will be given priority over other teams whose proposals are deemed to be of an equally high standard.

 

The deadline for submission of sub-theme proposals is 1st September 2018. Please send these to the local organizing committee at OUBS-CMS2019@open.ac.uk. Convenors will be notified by 29th September 2018 of the outcome of their submissions. Any questions can be directed to the same email address.

 

________________________________________________________

 

Item 6

Open University PhD Studentships

For the academic year beginning 1 February 2019 we are inviting applications for a number of full-time funded PhD studentships.

The studentships are based at the Milton Keynes campus and students are normally expected to live within commuting distance of Milton Keynes. The studentships cover tuition fees, a generous research training support grant and a stipend (circa £14,533 per annum) for 36 months.

In order to be considered for a funded studentship your application should preferably be based on an advertised project. Examples of projects recently advertised are listed further below.

Applications must include the following:

·       a 1000 word proposal which indicates your knowledge of the literature, methods and likely approach to your project of interest

·       a covering letter indicating your suitability for the project

·       a completed application form

·       certificates with transcripts, if possible, confirming your professional qualifications relevant to your application

Applicants for the PhD programme should have minimum qualifications of an upper second class honours degree 2:1 (or an equivalent) and usually a specialist masters in a subject relevant to the intended study with a strong research element.

Applicants who speak English as a foreign language and/or are applying for a Tier 4 visa must have achieved SELTS (Secure English Language Test) from a UK Border Agency-approved provider at level B2 or above in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), in all four elements (reading, writing, listening, speaking).

We also welcome full-time and part-time self-funded applications in topics in business and management, dependent on supervision availability.

The deadline for applications is 5pm GMT on Monday 8th October 2018.

Interviews will form part of the selection process and will be held on 17th, 18th or 23rd October in person (or via web conference if required). PhD candidates are expected to give a 15 minute presentation about their proposal, followed by a question and answer session.

PhD project titles we are offering are listed below and you can find out more by clicking on the individual links:

Centre for Policing Research and Learning (CPRL)

·       CPRL 01 The Experiences of LGBTQ and Professionals Working in Criminal Justice Organisations

Centre for Voluntary Sector Leadership (CVSL)

·       CVSL 02 The contribution of leadership in small and medium charities navigating change and transition

Department of Accounting and Finance (DAF)

·       DAF 03 A Comparison of Socially Responsible Investing and Sharia Complaint Funds

Department of People and Organisations (DPO)

·       DPO 04 The experiences of transpeople in the UK labour market

·       DPO 05 Grassroots spaces of recovery

·       DPO 06 tbc

Department of Strategy and Marketing (DSM)

·       DSM 07 Music and Consumer Response to Advertising

Department of Public Leadership and Social Enterprise (PuLSE)

·       PuLSE 11 Exploring enterprise, learning and growth from craft workshops to makerspaces

·       PuLSE 12 Promoting environmental sustainability in SMEs the role of intermediaries

·       PuLSE 13 Economic Citizenship and Governance in Brexit times

·       PuLSE 14 Understanding the relationship between identity and ethics in collaborative settings

 

 

Item 7

 

Contested Realities of the Circular Economy

 

This special issue of Culture and Organization invites contributions that question the Circular Economy in innovative ways. This special issue aims at bringing together critical, interpretive and theory-driven papers that go beyond the often repeated, but largely a-historical, a-practical, and a-theoretical, claims that the Circular Economy will help organizations solve 21st century problems. There is, for example, a rich history of economic and social practices (think of the frugality of survival practices during various wars) that could be seen as precursors of the Circular Economy, and one might ask: If such practices have been around for some time, why have they not been able to address the questions the Circular Economy aims to answer? Likewise, the Circular Economy has a lot to say about materials and their flows, but very little about humans and the social dimension of circular activities.

We welcome contributions that address the organisational and social aspects of the Circular Economy, including questions of power, process, and labour; its cultural aspects, including symbolic, political, and historical dimensions; its theoretical aspects, including how the Circular Economy relates to organizational theories of sustainability, change, and materiality; and its ethical aspects, including questions of justice, Otherness, and responsibility. Here is an indicative, arbitrary and in no way exhaustive list of possible topics:

•   Ethnographies of organizational transitions to the Circular Economy, including specific aspects of such transitions, such as product design, restorative and regenerative strategies, and the development of circular business models.

•   People at work in the Circular Economy: organizational, local, regional, and global approaches.

•   The Circular Economy and innovation, for example recycling techniques, technologies, information technology and social media.

•   Organizing materials in a circular economy, from mines to landfills (and the atmosphere) via storehouses and homes.

•   Scales of circularity: micro-, meso- or macro-loops?

•   The Circular Economy and systemic transformations of consumption.

•   Circular-economic governance: soft, strict, or otherwise (e.g., nudge), exploring, in particular, the role of incentives and legislation.

•   The Circular Economy and master-metaphors: from utopias to dystopias, from socialism to sustainable development, and from the myth of the eternal return to the Anthropocene.

•   The management of externalities in the Circular Economy.

•   The Circular Economy experience of countries at war, for example Nazi Germany, but also of countries under embargo, for example Cuba.

•   Regional differences in the Circular Economy, for example between the “Global North” and the “Global South”; circular economy and de-globalization.

•   Examining the discursive development of the Circular Economy, focusing on the roles of key organizations and institutions, such as the Ellen McArthur Foundation, McKinsey, the European Union and the World Economic Forum.

•   Deconstructing the Circular Economy discourse, for example, how the European Union connects the Circular Economy to safety as much as environmental sustainability.

•   The Circular Economy as aesthetic, but also as play, derision, irony, and provocation.

•   How the contemporary circular economy fails.

•   The Circular Economy as paradign shift.

Qualitative papers that open new spaces of reflection and understanding of the Circular Economy in organizations are welcome, regardless of their theoretical sources of inspiration. Innovation in writing and composing style are also welcome. In addition to scholars working in management and organization studies we therefore welcome contributions from – inter alia ­- anthropology, sociology, philosophy, politics, art history, communication, film, gender and cultural studies.

Submission Instructions

Please ensure that all submissions to the special issue are made via the ScholarOne site. You will have to sign up for an account before you are able to submit a manuscript. Please ensure when you do submit that you select the relevant special issue (Volume 26, Issue 2) to direct your submission appropriately. If you experience any problems, please contact the editors of this issue.

Style and other instructions on manuscript preparation can be found at the journal’s website. Manuscript length should not exceed 8000 words, including appendices and supporting materials. Please also be aware that any images used in your submission must be your own, or where they are not, you must already have permission to reproduce them in an academic journal. You should make this explicit in the submitted manuscript.

Manuscripts must be submitted by November 15th 2018.

Prospective authors are invited to discuss manuscript ideas for the special issue with the guest editors before the deadline for submissions.

Editorial information

•   Guest Editor: Hervé Corvellec, Lund University

•   Guest Editor: Steffen Böhm, University of Exeter

•   Guest Editor: Alison Stowell, Lancaster University

•   Guest Editor: Francisco Valenzuela, Nottingham Trent University

/.content

SCOS Update June 2018

Dear SCOSsers

Do not adjust your email settings, this month’s e-mail will have to serve for May as well, when many of you will have received a message from me regarding GDPR but not a conventional update. Our mailing list is now somewhat smaller than it was, but all the details are up-to-date! I will also take this opportunity to let you know that I will be passing the membership secretary baton on to Christina Schwabenland in July, but I’ll still be around looking after the funds in taking over from Jeroen as treasurer. If you haven’t looked at the SCOS website http://www.scos.org in a while, you might also want to take a peek now and then over the coming months as the SCOS board have been collecting lots of interesting reflections from SCOS members to delight and inspire you. There are also several editions of early SCOS newsletters and copies of the more recent ones should you want to check up on our past correspondence!
In this month’s message there are three lovely items
Item 1 CMS Call for sub-theme proposals
Item 2 SCOS Special Events Fund opening soon!
Item 3 CfP Dissensus! Radical Democracy and Business Ethics, JBE, reminder that extended deadline is 1st July
Item 4 Researching Management, Organisations and Leadership across Languages workshop
Best
Laura ??
If you wish to be removed from this mailing list, please click unsubscribe or contact l.mitchell@keele.ac.uk stating ‘unsubscribe from SCOS’ clearly in your email subject header.

Item 1 – CMS Call for sub-theme Proposals

The 11th International Critical Management Conference

 

PRECARIOUS PRESENTS, OPEN FUTURES

The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK

27th – 29th June 2019

 

CALL FOR SUB-THEME PROPOSALS

 

The Department for People and Organisations at the Open University Business School, in collaboration with VIDA, the Critical Management Studies Association, will host the International CMS conference in 2019 around the theme of ‘Precarious Presents, Open Futures’. This theme invites theoretical and empirical analysis of what it means for societies and organizations to be ‘open’ in the 21st century, what currently constitutes radical political, economic, cultural, historical and ethical openness, and how this openness is under attack from renewed discourses of individualized privilege and closure as well as physical violence.

It was once claimed that the new millennium would mark the ‘end of history’, characterized by the permanent victory of the free market and liberal democracy anticipated by neo-liberalism. Yet these triumphant visions have been profoundly challenged by the global financial crisis and the growing populist demand for radical change across the ideological spectrum. Rising inequality and the growth of the precarious economy, marked by zero hour contracts and other unstable and insecure working arrangements, have meant that for many, modern working life is tainted by material insecurity and psychological anxiety. Faith in democracy is being abused by the spread of oligarchy and the troubling return of nativism, racism and nationalism. Our identities are threatened in a present where personal data are routinely harvested and exploited, as exemplified by many recent scandals. And all of these concerns are exacerbated by fear of a hi-tech, automated, dystopian future of mass unemployment.

Still, these uncertainties may also prove to be the catalyst for creating new opportunities to profoundly reshape and reorganize our economies, politics and societies. Neoliberalist assumptions, once held sacred, are now threatened by new ideas, such as a universal basic income, while seemingly entrenched elites may be at risk. ‘Industry 4.0’ – a potentially unholy mix of the Internet of Things, cloud computing, artificial intelligence and cyber-physical systems, predicted to revolutionize manufacturing – is a very daunting possibility. However, it might be supplemented, dramatically transformed, even supplanted by ideas of ‘democracy 4.0’ and ‘development 4.0’. Perhaps we can reimagine contemporary management thinking and organizations so that they are as radically ‘empowering’ as they are ‘smart’, challenging dominant interwoven paradigms based on patriarchy, racism, ethnic discrimination, ageism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism and colonialism.

For these reasons, it is more urgent than ever to ask: who is influencing these new histories and how do, and can, critical management academics participate in them? How can they be further democratized and owned by the many rather than the elite few, the 99% and not the 1%? In the western world, developments like the election of Donald Trump, Brexit, and Theresa May’s ‘confidence and supply’ agreement with the Irish Democratic Unionist Party reveal a distinct politics of closure and exclusion in regard to geographic borders, ‘facts’ and hard-won progress around expanding social inclusion. On the other hand, in the southern hemisphere the election of Jacinda Ardern, a committed feminist who is passionate about the eradication of child poverty and homelessness, calls for a questioning of taken for granted, western-centric approaches to politics as well as an amplification of New Zealand’s voice on the global stage.

At stake, then, is a resurgent need to radically reconceive the meanings and practices associated with openness. It is also vital that we critically assess how and in what ways they might actually be(come) open, rather than simply giving the appearance of openness. Open source creation, collaboration and information are recalibrating the potential for personal and collective interactions and knowledge sharing across the globe. In short, then, how can participants in CMS contribute to transforming our precarious presents into possibilities for genuinely open futures?

For the 2019 conference, we therefore invite stream and workshop proposals from diverse disciplines as well as interdisciplinary proposals which critically unpack new concepts including – but not limited to – digital inclusion, decolonizing data management, trans-human management, alternative human-animal relations, open source organizations, virtual progress, global solidarity and mobile organizing. These concepts (and many others) allow for an exploration of how technologies and emerging forms of organization can subvert established identities, and open the space for new and marginalized voices to shape our presents and futures. We are also interested in proposals, again from diverse disciplines within and without the field of management studies, that engage with the contemporary production and organization of knowledge – specifically its openness to alternative perspectives and traditionally marginalized voices – as well as how emerging techniques and technologies associated with ‘open information’ are reinforcing old or fostering new forms of ideological and social closure.  Proposals which engage with the broader sociopolitical, economic and technological changes outlined above and how CMS can respond to them in order to help shape more open societies are equally welcome. These would require reflection on our own role as researchers, educators and intellectual activists, as well as the (changing) role of universities in producing both closures and openness in the contemporary context. Just as importantly, we are committed to ‘opening up’ how a conference is organized and managed, creating collaborative spaces for constructive knowledge sharing between academics, activists, practitioners, artists and policy makers, inter alia. These could include activist-led ‘unstreams’ or ‘noworkshops’, performances, art sharing sessions and interactive installations involving virtual technology and mobile games.

Proposals should include an outline of the proposed sub-theme (500-750 words), as well as a short description of the team of convenors, including their backgrounds and experience. Ideally, convenors for streams will be drawn from different continents and disciplines, and be gender-balanced. We would also like to encourage the inclusion of early-career academics and Doctoral students as part of convener teams. We expect most of the submissions to be linked with the overall conference theme, but other submissions are welcome as long as they are likely to appeal to the wider CMS community and beyond. We are keen to encourage proposals from the range of management studies disciplines (accounting and finance, human resource management, industrial relations, marketing and consumption, organization studies, international business, etc.) and related disciplines including – but not limited to – sociology, human geography, cultural studies, anthropology and psychology. Cross-/multi-/interdisciplinary proposals are very much encouraged.

Please note that we will apply the principle of progressive stacking in the event that we receive more proposals than we can accommodate for the conference. This approach means that convenor teams including members of non-dominant gender, racial, ethnic, sexual, age, ability and regional groupings will be given priority over other teams whose proposals are deemed to be of an equally high standard.

The deadline for submission of sub-theme proposals is 1st September 2018. Please send these to the local organizing committee at OUBS-CMS2019@open.ac.uk. Convenors will be notified by 29th September 2018 of the outcome of their submissions. Any questions can be directed to the same email address.


 

Item 2 – SCOS Special Events Fund
Keep your eyes peeled for July’s member’s mailing when we will be launching the SCOS Special events fund to support activities of a SCOSsy nature outside of the conferences. Applications will be expected to outline how the event is in keeping with the nature of SCOS ‘Serious Fun’, and can be for all sorts of events, from workshops to film-making. Awards of between £500 and £2000 will be available, and the first deadline for applications will be in October.

Item 3 –

DEADLINE EXTENDED UNTIL JULY 1ST

Apologies for cross-postings

Call for Papers

Special Issue of the Journal of Business Ethics

DISSENSUS! RADICAL DEMOCRACY AND BUSINESS ETHICS

GUEST EDITORS:

Carl Rhodes, University of Technology Sydney, Australia. carl.rhodes@uts.edu.au

Iain Munro, Newcastle University, UK. iain.munro@ncl.ac.uk

Torkild Thanem, Stockholm University, Sweden. tt@sbs.su.se

Alison Pullen, Macquarie University, Australia. alison.pullen@mq.edu.au

INTRODUCTION TO THE SPECIAL ISSUE

In an era of prolonged financial crisis, political instability and worldwide injustice, the economic and ethical legitimacy of corporate power requires continued challenge. Scandal after scandal has revealed corporations showing little regard for the institutions of liberal democracy. Whether it be tax evasion, law breaking, political lobbying or outright corruption, corporations are content to flout notions of justice, equality and freedom in an escalating pursuit of profit (see Barkan 2013; Brown 2015). Liberal democracy promises opportunity and inclusion, yet democratic states are complicit in strengthening the power of the corporations they glorify as wealth creators and job securers. In ‘post-democracy’ (Crouch, 2004) politics revolves around the conflated interests of corporations and politicians, reinforcing injustice and inequality on a global scale and resulting in poverty, torture, trafficking, imprisonment, and death.

This special issue will investigate and challenge this state of affairs by exploring business ethics as it relates to ‘radical democracy’ (Mouffe, 1996; Robbins, 2011). This is democracy conceived as an ethical alternative to the potent marriage of the liberal democratic state and corporate power. As Rancière (2015) explains, the political dissensus required for democracy bears witness to marginalized voices excluded from the prevailing status quo. Such dissensus also enacts a particular ethics rested in the radical questioning and subversion of the totalizing tendencies of power. In response to what Ziarek (2001) has called ‘the ethics of dissensus’, the political task is to fight against the powers, injustices and inequalities that affect people not just politically, but also materially. This ethics goes beyond the questioning of corporate power, and projects us towards trajectories where people already live and work independently of the corporate-government complex. The ethics and politics of dissensus becomes the radically democratic alternative, directed towards sustainable futures at the level of life itself.

POSSIBLE THEMES AND TOPICS

Papers are called for which explore the ethics and politics of radical democracy as it manifests in dissensus and the subversion of corporate power by alternative democratic practices and realities. This is no fantasy, it is witnessed by struggles in domains as diverse as environmentalism, agriculture, affective labour, domestic work, craftwork, art, and the hacker ethic of the open source community. Acknowledging that contemporary politics have created an inverse relationship between corporate power and democracy, we seek to consider the character of this inversion, how it has been resisted, and the alternatives to it.

We do not just ask whether democratic alternatives to the liberalistic reign of corporations, markets and corporate governments are possible, but how they are and can be realized. Required is a profound ethico-political engagement; a struggle that moves from critique, to resistance, to alternative realities. This evokes, in Spivak’s (1993) words, an ‘impossible intimacy of the ethical’ that strives for a genuine respect of the value of difference. Such intimacy can also invoke a politically aware and democratic business ethics built on the potential of dissent, alterity and critique as a means of refusing hegemony of all types.

Papers might consider, but are by no means limited to, the following topics:

•              The effects of Free Trade Agreements and trade wars on democracy.

•              Spaces, places and strategies for ethicso-political democratic dissent.

•              The politics, ethics and aesthetics of dissensus, through feminism and critical race theory.

•              The ethico-political struggle for alternative ways of life, work and organization in the context of global and nationalist capitalism.

•              Alternative economies and the subversion of free market liberalism.

•              The development of a heterodox management studies to better imagine alternatives within the field of management studies.

•              The ‘depoliticization’ of theory and academic work more generally

•              The praxis, organization and effectiveness of anti-corporate movements.

•              Business ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility as anti-democratic forms of corporate consensus.

•              Inequality, difference and class struggle.

•              Critiques of corporate sovereignty, justice and dissent.

•              Tensions between the materiality of democracy, neoliberal rationality and neoconservative ideology.

SUBMISSION PROCESS AND DEADLINE

Authors should refer to the Journal of Business Ethics website for instructions on submitting a paper and for more information about the journal: http://www.springer.com/social+sciences/applied+ethics/journal/10551. Submission to the special issue by 1 July 2018 is required through Editorial Manager at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/busi/. Upon submission, please indicate that your sub- mission is to this Special Issue. Questions about potential topics and papers should be directed to the guest editors.

REFERENCES

Barkan, J. (2013) Corporate Sovereignty: Law and Government Under Capitalism, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Brown, W. (2015) Undoing the Demos: Neoliberalism’s Stealth Revolution, New York: Zone Books.

Crouch, C. (2004) Post-Democracy, Cambridge: Polity.

Mouffe, C. (1996) Dimensions of Radical Democracy: Pluralism, Citizenship, Community. London: Verso.

Rancière, J. (2015) Dissensus: On Politics and Aesthetics, London: Continuum

Robbins, J. W. (2011) Radical Democracy and Political Theology, New York: Columbia.

Spivak , G. (1993) Outside the Teaching Machine, London: Routeldge.

Ziarek, E. P. (2001) Postmodernity, Feminism and the Politics of Radical Democracy. Stanford: Stanford University Press.


Researching Management, Organisations and Leadership across Languages
3rd September 2018
BAM 2018 @ Bristol Business School, UWE
Are you a PhD student or an Early-Career researcher interested in and/or doing research that involves working across cultures and languages? Then you are warmly invited to this 1-day pre British Academy of Management development workshop! Register by emailing doris.schedlitzki@uwe.ac.uk to secure your place at this free event.
Aim:
This 1-day development workshop works with ideas originally published in Schedlitzki et al.’s (2017) call for a refocused research agenda for cultural leadership studies. We argued in this review of cultural leadership research that the field is still dominated by etic, cross-cultural research, limiting our current insight into cultural and linguistic multiplicity, power dynamics and paradoxes. Steyaert and Janssens (2013) have previously highlighted that the management field has failed to acknowledge the issue of linguistic multiplicity and added that the fields of leadership – and management – need to adopt conceptual and methodological approaches that embrace cultural and linguistic multiplicity (Schedlitzki et al., 2017). This 1-day development workshop therefore focuses on the complexities of researching leadership, management and organisations across languages and aims to develop PhD and early career researchers’ knowledge of and ability to apply emic, constructionist approaches to researching these fields that are linguistically and culturally sensitive.
During this development workshop, PhD and early career researchers will be able to work on areas such as:
  • Becoming inventive in multilingual work in management, organisation and leadership studies
  • Being more imaginative and experimental in ways of researching that include languages and language differences
  • Becoming reflexive and reflective when using English for publication purposes
  • Seeing language as heterogeneous, political and powerful
  • Investigating how researchers might represent people in the translation process
  • Illuminating processes of communication and power dynamics in empirical material and analysis
  • The peculiarities and specificities of publishing in different languages
  • Considering the cultural and linguistic relevance of management, organisation and leadership in differing languages
  • Enhancing understanding of cultural and language multiplicity
  • Promoting ‘local’ management, organisation and leadership research
  • Exploring negative repercussions of overlooking language in research
  • Exploring methodological approaches and data collection methods in studying management, organisations and leadership across differing languages
  • Uncovering marginalized linguistically meaningful organizational concepts
This will be facilitated through a variety of different activities on the day:
  • An Opening Address will help to set the scene and explore some of the key conceptual and methodological complexities when researching across cultural and linguistic boundaries.
  • Roundtable sessions will give participants the opportunity to present and discuss a particular aspect or issue from their own research. Peer feedback and feedback from established academics will encourage development opportunities.
  • Technique workshops will help participants to develop hands-on skills in aspects of the complexity of researching across languages.
  • Open space workshops focussed on a particular topic (such as translation issues) will be facilitated by established academics and aim to support participants through unique insights into opportunities and challenges in researching and publishing research in this area of business and management.
  • A ‘meet the editors’ session will help participants to gain a better understanding of potential publication routes for their research.
  • The collaborative nature of the event therefore also represents networking opportunities with peers and established researchers in the fields.
Programme Outline
9.00-9.30: Arrival, registration and coffee
9.30-10.30: Opening Address
10.30-10.45: Break
10.45-12.15: Roundtable discussions
12.15-13.15: Lunch
13.15-14.15: Technique workshops
14.15-14.30: Break
14.30-15.30: Open Space workshops
15.30-15.45: Break
15.45-16.30: Meet the Editors Session
16.30-17.00: Final Networking and coffee/drinks
Register now:
Please email: doris.schedlitzki@uwe.ac.uk by the 31st May 2018 to register and secure a place.
Once registered, we invite you to submit a 300 word outline of the issue/aspect of research that you would like to explore and discuss during the roundtable session.
PhD students may apply for small bursaries that can be used to contribute to travel or accommodation (specifics to follow).
KEY WORKSHOP INFORMATION
Organisers:
Please refer all initial queries regarding the conference Dr Doris Schedlitzki:
Dr Doris Schedlitzki – Doris.schedlitzki@uwe.ac.uk
Co-organisers:
Dr Hugo Gaggiotti – hugo.gaggiotti@uwe.ac.uk
Dr Gareth Edwards – Gareth3.edwards@uwe.ac.uk
Venue:
Bristol Business School
University of the West of England
Frenchay Campus
Coldharbour Lane, Bristol
BS16 1QY, United Kingdom

SCOS Update April 2018

Dear Scossers,

A note to try to lighten the weight of your day today with dragon-like fantasies may be somewhat tarnished by the bureaucratic requirement of organisational compliance in item 1. Nonetheless, please make sure you get in touch to keep receiving the newsletter. Our other items should fit more closely with your aesthetic, symbolic and future imaginaries. Take a look!

Item 1 –  GDPR and SCOS – get in touch to stay in or opt out of the newsletter!

Item 2 – Call For Papers –  the 9th Making Projects Critical Workshop

Item 3 – Call for Sub-theme proposals CMS 2019

Item 4 – Still accepting submissions to C&O Special Issue on ‘Carne’

Item 5 – Senior Lecturer vacancy at UWE

Best

Laura


Item 1: GDPR and SCOS

Dear SCOS members

as many of you will know, General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a new legal requirement coming into effect in the UK next month based on EU law to protect citizen’s information. As an unincorporated association without paid employees, SCOS doesn’t fall into the majority of the categories affected by the most substantial audit and record-keeping requirements. However, as many of the board members are employees of university systems and these are the systems we use to store information and communicate with each other we are beholden to university practices. As member secretary it also seems to me a timely opportunity to communicate with you about the way in which we collect and manage members information.

What personal data do we have on members?

We hold information on member’s names, e-mail addresses, institutional affiliation or company, and (where provided) job title, country of residence and joining date. Conference organisers also collect information specific to participants and attendees of the conference such as postal addresses, contact details, payment information and dietary requirements.

Who can access this information?

Member information is accessible to the board members. A full list of board members and positions is available on our website http://www.scos.org/scos-board/ where you can also find our constitution which outlines the roles and electoral process in more detail. Members can request to find out what information is held about them (and request corrections!) by getting in touch with the membership secretary or relevant conference organisers.

What is this data used for?

Membership information is used to promote communications and connections between SCOS members on the interlinked issues of organizational symbolism, culture and change, and interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary understandings of organisation and management. Communications are sent (approximately) monthly through the newsletter and are duplicated on social media platforms. Data collected by conference organisers is passed to the SCOS board annually so we can add new members to the newsletter mailing list and also passed on to the publishers of the journal Culture & Organisation in order to manage paper subscriptions and e-subscriptions to the journal. 

Changes in practice

In line with the GDPR changes, I need to have a record of opted-in consent from members to hold and process your data. As membership secretary I will review these records following the conference and will be making it easier for you to opt-out of further communications and withdraw from membership by adding a clear unsubscribe link to the newsletter.

What do I need to do?

  • If you still want to receive the regular newsletter and be registered as a SCOS member, send an email reply to the membership secretary with the clear subject ‘remain a member’ 
  • If you definitely want to be removed from our list of members and would like to unsubscribe from the newsletter send an email reply to the membership secretary with the clear subject ‘unsubscribe‘.

Reminders will be sent to members from whom I have not had a response until late May after which time those members on the list who have not responded will be removed from the current membership list.


Item 2 Call For Papers –  the 9th Making Projects Critical Workshop

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the 9th Making Projects Critical Workshop, to be held at Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden, on Jan 17-18, 2019.

“Making Projects Critical” is the title of series of international workshops intended to provide a forum for research from a wide range of critical perspectives relating to all aspects of projects, including project management, project based organising and the ‘projectification’ of society. Such critique finds inspiration in the writings of a range of authors, drawing, among others, on Labour Process Theory, Critical Theory, Actor Network Theory (and post-ANT), STS, sociomateriality, critical environmentalism, feminism, postmodernism, moral-philosophical pedagogy and other traditions broadly related to Critical Management Studies.

Through the workshop, we hope to highlight and, where possible, remedy the theoretical and methodological limitations of traditional conceptions of projects and project management. In particular, the intention is to draw upon wider intellectual resources than the instrumental rationality, quantitative and positivist methodologies and technicist solutions, which have been used traditionally to understand, implement and control organisational projects, and to reflect on the implications of alternative perspectives for project management practice.

For the MPC9 we especially invite papers that address one or several of the following themes:

  • Projects in non-traditional project settings: Which tensions occur when projects are implemented and carried out in settings where projects are deployed as support activities rather than constituting the core business? How is resistance manifested and how does power shift in such organisations when projects are deployed? Which discursive strategies are employed to deal with dysfunctionalities?

  • Projects and digitalisation: How are projects, project work and project management digitalised and how may this be understood from a critical theoretical perspective? What happens to project members as possibilities of monitoring them increase? Which are the new “digital divides” that digital project work creates? How do project workers collaborate with digital co-workers? Are digitalization efforts carried out through projects and with which consequences?

  • Projects and space: How is project work spatially situated and which are the consequences of this for the distribution of power? What does the emergence of collaborative spaces of various kinds (coworking spaces, fablabs, activity-based offices, etc) mean for project work? does the projectification of society enable the emergence of new workplaces? How does project work affect the relation to the “workplace”, whatever this may be (for instance in the case of nomadic workers)?

  • Critical projects: How are subversive, norm critical/creative and revolutionary projects managed? How do projects with objectives relating to gender, ethnicity, equality, sustainability and social innovation unfold? Which barriers and pitfalls do they encounter and how may this be related to their form, the role of stakeholders or the practices that develop in and through them?

We also invite papers that broadly address the themes typical of the critical project management tradition, for example: power, domination, resistance and emancipation in project work; dysfunctional project rationalities; projectification and de-projectification; dialectics, disruption, revolution and reformation in and through projects; tensions between standardization and creativity in project organisations; and ethics and moral responsibility within projects.

Papers may draw on ethnographies, case studies or the study of discourses but may also be in the form of conceptualisations or theoretical discussions.

Extended abstracts (2-3 pages including references) required by September 1st 2018. Please send all submissions via e-mail to MPC9@mdh.se with “MPC9 abstract” in the subject header.

For more information and the Call For Papers, please see the workshop webpage: http://www.mdh.se/forskning/event/2.5058


Item 3 – CMS 2019 Call for sub-theme proposals

The 11th International Conference in Critical Management Studies

 

PRECARIOUS PRESENTS, OPEN FUTURES

Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK

27th – 29th June 2019

 

CALL FOR SUB-THEME PROPOSALS

 

The Department for People and Organisations, in collaboration with VIDA, the Critical Management Studies Association, will host the International CMS conference in 2019 around the theme of ‘Precarious Presents, Open Futures’. This theme invites theoretical and empirical analysis of what it means for societies and organizations to be ‘open’ in the 21st century, what currently constitutes radical political, economic, historical and ethical openness, and how this openness is under attack from renewed discourses of individualized privilege and closure.

 

It was once claimed that the new millennium would mark the ‘end of history’, characterized by the permanent victory of the free market and liberal democracy. Yet these triumphant visions have been profoundly challenged by the global financial crisis and the growing populist demand for radical change across the ideological spectrum. Rising inequality and the growth of the precarious economy, marked by zero hour contracts and other unstable and insecure working arrangements, have meant that, for many, modern working life is tainted by material insecurity and psychological anxiety. Faith in democracy is being upturned by the spread of oligarchy and the troubling return of nativism, racism and nationalism. Our very identities are threatened in a present where personal data are routinely harvested and exploited, as exemplified by many recent scandals. And all of these concerns are exacerbated by fear of a hi-tech, automated, dystopian future of mass unemployment.

 

Still, these uncertainties may also prove to be the catalyst for creating new opportunities to profoundly reshape and reorganize our economies, politics and societies. Once sacred neoliberalist assumptions are now threatened by new ideas, like a universal basic income, while seemingly entrenched elites may be at risk. ‘Industry 4.0’ – a potentially unholy mix of the Internet of Things, cloud computing, artificial intelligence and cyber-physical systems, which is predicted to revolutionize manufacturing – is a very daunting possibility. However, it might be supplemented, dramatically transformed, even supplanted by ideas of ‘democracy 4.0’ and ‘development 4.0’. Perhaps we can completely reimagine contemporary management thinking and organizations so that they are as radically ‘empowering’ as they are ‘smart’, challenging dominant paradigms based on patriarchy, racism and ethnic discrimination, ageism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism and colonialism.

 

For these reasons, it is more urgent than ever to ask: who is influencing these new histories? How can they be further democratized and owned by the many rather than the elite few, the 99% and not the 1%? Such concerns are especially significant as developments like Brexit and the election of Donald Trump reveal a distinct politics of closure and exclusion in regard to geographic borders, ‘facts’ and hard-won progress around expanding social inclusion. At the same time, open source creation, collaboration and information are recalibrating the potential for personal and collective interactions and knowledge sharing across the globe. At stake, therefore, is a resurgent need to radically reconceive the meanings and practices associated with openness. It is also vital that we critically assess how and in what ways they might actually be(come) open, rather than simply giving the appearance of openness.   In short, then, how can CMS contribute to transforming our precarious presents into possibilities for genuinely open futures?

 

For the 2019 conference, we therefore invite stream and workshop proposals which critically unpack new concepts including – but not limited to – digital inclusion, decolonizing data management, trans-human management, alternative human-animal relations, open source organizations, virtual progress, glocal solidarity and mobile organizing. These concepts (and many others) allow for an exploration of how technologies and emerging forms of organization can subvert established identities, and open the space for new and marginalized voices to shape our presents and futures. We are also interested in proposals that engage with the contemporary production and organization of knowledge – specifically its openness to alternative perspectives and traditionally marginalized voices – as well as how emerging techniques and technologies associated with ‘open information’ are reinforcing old or fostering new forms of ideological and social closure.  Proposals which engage with the broader sociopolitical, economic and technological changes outlined above and how CMS can respond to them in order to help shape more open societies are equally welcome. These would require reflection on our own role as researchers, educators and ‘intellectual activists’, as well as the (changing) role of universities in producing both closures and openness in the contemporary context. Just as importantly, we are committed to ‘opening up’ how a conference is organized and managed, creating collaborative spaces for constructive knowledge sharing between academics, activists, practitioners, artists and policy makers, inter alia. These could include activist led ‘unstreams’ or ‘noworkshops’, performances, art sharing sessions and interactive installations involving virtual technology and mobile games.

 

Proposals should include an outline of the proposed sub-theme (500-750 words), as well as a short description of the team of convenors, including their backgrounds and experience. We expect most of the submissions to be linked with the overall conference theme, but other submissions are welcome as long as they are likely to appeal to the wider CMS community. We particularly seek proposals from convenor teams that are international in their composition; and are keen to encourage proposals from the range of management studies disciplines (accounting and finance, human resource management, industrial relations, marketing and consumption, organization studies, international business, etc.) and related disciplines including – but not limited to – sociology, human geography, cultural studies, anthropology and psychology. Cross-,multi-/ interdisciplinary proposals are also very much encouraged.

 

Please note that we will apply the principle of progressive stacking in the event that  we receive more proposals than we can accommodate for the conference. This approach means that convenor teams including members of non-dominant gender, racial, ethnic, sexual, age, ability and regional groupings will be given priority over other teams whose proposals are deemed to be of an equally high standard.

 

The deadline for submission of sub-theme proposals is 1st September 2018. Please send these to the local organizing committee at OUBS-CMS2019@open.ac.uk. Convenors will be notified by 29th  September 2018 of the outcome of their submissions. Any questions can be directed to the same email address.


Item 4 – C&O CfP ‘Carne’ – it’s meaty business!

CARNE – Flesh and Organization

Call for papers for a special issue of culture and organization

volume 25, issue 4, 2019

“Flesh, we believe – more than bodies – is at stake in our posthuman times, in the sense that it is flesh that is subject to increased control either in the laboratory or the marketplace and is caught up in processes of modification that seek to master and profit from it.” (Diamanti et al., 2009, 4)

This call for papers takes off from the longstanding use of the notion of flesh in academic investigations of the more or less porous boundaries between the self, others and the world around us. Flesh, these works suggest, is ontologically slippery and definitionally elusive. For Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1964), flesh reconnects the viewing and the visible, the touching and the touched, the body and the world. Perception itself is a fleshly – auditory, visual, gustatory, haptic, olfactory – activity. Moreover, as Antonio Strati (2007) points out in his discussion of the connections between practice-based learning and ‘sensible knowledge’ in organizations, when we perceive others, we always perceive them as fundamentally corporeal. Equally, the world acts upon our flesh, so that what or whom we touch, see, smell, taste and hear may touch, see, smell, taste and hear us. Elsewhere, Michel Foucault locates modern western scientia sexualis as having its origins in the earliest years of Christianity and its confessional regime which seeks to unearth “the important secrets of the flesh” (1977, 154) as the deepest truths of the human subject. In this reading, flesh is the natural body, always and irrevocably bound to sin and to death.

Cherríe Moraga (2015, 19), on the other hand, identifies a theory in the flesh as “one where the physical realities of our lives – our skin color, the land or concrete we grew up on, our sexual longings – all fuse to create a politic born out of necessity”. In a very different feminist analysis, Judith Butler (1990, 96, 33) defines gender as the “styles of the flesh” which “congeal over time”; whereas Vicki Kirby (1997) takes her and other feminist poststructuralists to task in Telling Flesh for their overstatement of the cultural inscription of the body, and argues that “once you are seriously displacing the nature/language opposition, you have to be arguing that nature, far from being written on, and insofar as it cannot be said to ‘lack language’, ‘must be articulate’ (page 90).

Elspeth Probyn (2001), on the other hand, provides a dazzling array of ways to understand skin both materially, metonymically and metaphorically – it protects and is vulnerable, it can be bruised and breached, it is porous, it expands and retracts, it devours and is devoured, it has colour, texture and sensation.

Organization studies scholars have, nonetheless, perhaps been somewhat neglectful of flesh in our various endeavours; whilst for the last three decades or so we have paid a great deal of attention to the body, we have largely overlooked flesh. Yet, as our opening epigraph implies, flesh can be connected to organization/s and organizing in manifold different ways. Possible contributions to this special issue could therefore include but are certainly not limited to:

  • The pleasures of the flesh: carnality, sensuality, excess and indulgence in, of and as provided by organizations (and their opposites).
  • ‘Fleshworkers’ – cosmetic surgeons, masseuses, cosmetic surgeons, tattooists, make-up artists, slaughterhouse workers, morticians, laboratory scientists etc. – and the markets for their services.
  • The resurging significance of the provenance of meat and fish in western eating habits and its cultural, symbolic and economic implications.
  • Vegetarianism, veganism, ‘clean’ and raw food diets, the markets around and commodification of these practices.
  • Researching the flesh, bodily, sensory, fleshly, aesthetic or sensible knowing and/ or methods, the ethics of fleshly research.  Organizing (and researching) in meatspace and virtual space, ‘in the flesh’ and online.
  • Bodily changes, wounding, scarring and dysmorphia in organizations.
  • Flesh-eaters and the undead: cannibals, vampires and zombies as organizational metaphors.
  • The organization of organ donation and the global black market in body parts.
  • The global meat industry and its manifold discontents: eg, the certification and marketing of halal meat, the UK horse meat scandal.
  • (Re)incarnation and incorporation in and of organizations.
  • Pro-ana, pro-mia and fat acceptance organizations.
  • Organizational metaphors of the flesh: eg, the ‘lean organization’, a ‘meaty question’, ‘fleshing out an argument’, a ‘meat market’, ‘dead meat’ etc.
  • The use of animal skin for clothing and furnishings and the complex global differences of necessity versus excess.
  • The ethics and politics of organizing as understood through Agamben’s zoë (bare life) and bios (qualified life) … and so on.

This list is intended to be indicative only.  Innovative interpretations of the call are encouraged.  With its long tradition of inter-disciplinary approaches, C&O invites papers that draw insights and approaches from across a range of social sciences and humanities.  In addition to scholars working in management and organization studies we welcome contributions from anthropology, sociology, philosophy, politics, art history, communication, film, gender and cultural studies. We also welcome papers from any disciplinary, paradigmatic or methodological perspective as long as they directly address the theme of flesh and organization.  

Editorial team, submission and informal enquiries

The editorial team for this special issue are: Ilaria Boncori (University of Essex), Jo Brewis (University of Leicester), Luigi Maria Sicca (University of Naples) and Charlie Smith (University of Leicester).

Please ensure that all submissions to the special issue are made via the ScholarOne Culture and Organization site at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/gsco. You will have to sign up for an account before you are able to submit a manuscript. Please ensure when you do submit that you select the relevant special issue (Volume 25, Issue 4) to direct your submission appropriately. If you experience any problems, please contact the editors of this issue.

Style and other instructions on manuscript preparation can be found at the journal’s website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gsco20/current. Manuscript length should not exceed 8000 words, including appendices and supporting materials. Please also be aware that any images used in your submission must be your own, or where they are not, you must already have permission to reproduce them in an academic journal. You should make this explicit in the submitted manuscript.

Manuscripts must be submitted by 31st May 2018.

Prospective authors are invited to discuss manuscript ideas for the special issue with the guest editors before the deadline for submissions.  They can be reached via e-mail at: scosxxxv@gmail.com.

References

Butler, Judith. 1990. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge, Chapman and Hall.

Foucault, Michel. 1977. “Power and Sex.” Telos 32: 152-161.

Hart, Lynda. 1998. Between the Body and the Flesh: Performing Sadomasochism. Columbia University Press: New York.

Kirby, Vicki. 1997. Telling Flesh: The Substance of the Corporeal. New York: Routledge.

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. 1962. Phenomenology of Perception. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Moraga, Cherríe. 2015. “Introduction. Entering the Lives of Others: Theory in the Flesh.” In This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, edited by Cherríe Moraga and Gloria E. Anzaldúa, fourth edition, 19. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Probyn, Elspeth. 2001. “Eating Skin.” In Thinking Through the Skin, edited by Sara Ahmed and Jackie Stacey, 87-103. London: Routledge.

Strati, Antonio. 2007. “Sensible Knowledge and Practice-Based Learning.” Management Learning 38 (1): 61-77.


Item 5 – Vacancy at UWE

Senior Lecturer in Organisation Studies (Leadership and Change)

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BJA464/senior-lecturer-in-organisation-studies-leadership-and-change/

The Department of Business and Management, based in UWE’s Bristol Business School, comprises four subject clusters. The Organisation Studies (OS) cluster is currently looking to recruit a Senior Lecturer in the areas of Leadership and Change.

The OS subject cluster has 34 permanent members of academic staff, including 3 professors, 4 associate professors and a number of Associate Lecturers. In addition to Leadership and Change, the cluster also covers Organisational Behaviour, Coaching and Mentoring at PG/UG and ILM 5 and ILM 7.

The OS cluster includes coaching and most academic input into innovative UG Team Entrepreneurship and the PG Applied Entrepreneurship programme.

Colleagues in OS also contribute to teaching across the range of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the Faculty of Business and Law alongside a range of practice-based programmes and bespoke offerings.

We are looking for a candidate to increase our capacity in the areas of Leadership and Change. Successful applicants will join a thriving community of academics engaged in a broad range of research and scholarly activities across these areas with many colleagues actively participating in The Bristol Centre for Leadership and Change.

At senior lecturer level, you will actively lead and participate in the design, development and assessment of module(s), and take overall responsibility for the academic health and currency of the module(s)/programme and perform a visible leadership role in relation to the teaching team.

Anyone interested in this Bristol Business School vacancy please get in touch with Peter Case, email: Peter.Case@uwe.ac.uk and mobile: +44 (0)7896 281408

SCOS Update March 2018

Dear Scossers

We have a number of lovely items for you as the turning of the vernal equinox here in the northern hemisphere begins to melt us out of our saurian style hibernation. For those in the southern hemisphere I hope such juicy fragments might sustain you through darkening days (whether sunshine or cricket-related).

Our first item recalls ancient history, as the flesh of Venus Victrix, luscious and appealing promotes a dehumanised fleshy idea to admire, conquer and dismember – Canova’s hard marble apple reminds us of the implacable destructive consequences following an impassioned choice. Perhaps these consequences were felt as equally by the husband of Pauline Bonaparte as by the inhabitants of Troy, we can only speculate. Have you felt the fleshy urge to submit a paper to the C&O special issue on Carne and now face the hard resistant marble of organisational commitments? We would induce you to face the intervention of Eristake a bite of inspiration and follow your desires…

Our second item questions the meaning of outreach and engagement by thinking about what it might mean to truly include Others. To what degree is reaching out a limited symbolic gesture which effects much less than it implies? This workshop is a Theatre and Performance Research Association (TaPRA) event and may be of particular interest to scossers working on or with the creative and performance industries.

Our third item promotes creative and alternative perspectives on the constitution of knowledge, and on what that might mean for research undertaken collaboratively with communities. This summer school may be of particular interest to PhD candidates.

Our fourth item reminds you of our digital world, which may seem like a ghostly presence compared to the bodily experience of the annual conference, but which is a very real gate into the SCOS garden to those who have not yet heard of SCOS or who are unable to participate in the conference in person. We would like to continue to encourage you to help plant some flowers there in the form of digital content.

Best Wishes

Laura


Item 1 C&O CfP ‘Carne’

CARNE – Flesh and Organization

Call for papers for a special issue of culture and organization

volume 25, issue 4, 2019

“Flesh, we believe – more than bodies – is at stake in our posthuman times, in the sense that it is flesh that is subject to increased control either in the laboratory or the marketplace and is caught up in processes of modification that seek to master and profit from it.” (Diamanti et al., 2009, 4)

This call for papers takes off from the longstanding use of the notion of flesh in academic investigations of the more or less porous boundaries between the self, others and the world around us. Flesh, these works suggest, is ontologically slippery and definitionally elusive. For Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1964), flesh reconnects the viewing and the visible, the touching and the touched, the body and the world. Perception itself is a fleshly – auditory, visual, gustatory, haptic, olfactory – activity. Moreover, as Antonio Strati (2007) points out in his discussion of the connections between practice-based learning and ‘sensible knowledge’ in organizations, when we perceive others, we always perceive them as fundamentally corporeal. Equally, the world acts upon our flesh, so that what or whom we touch, see, smell, taste and hear may touch, see, smell, taste and hear us. Elsewhere, Michel Foucault locates modern western scientia sexualis as having its origins in the earliest years of Christianity and its confessional regime which seeks to unearth “the important secrets of the flesh” (1977, 154) as the deepest truths of the human subject. In this reading, flesh is the natural body, always and irrevocably bound to sin and to death.

Cherríe Moraga (2015, 19), on the other hand, identifies a theory in the flesh as “one where the physical realities of our lives – our skin color, the land or concrete we grew up on, our sexual longings – all fuse to create a politic born out of necessity”. In a very different feminist analysis, Judith Butler (1990, 96, 33) defines gender as the “styles of the flesh” which “congeal over time”; whereas Vicki Kirby (1997) takes her and other feminist poststructuralists to task in Telling Flesh for their overstatement of the cultural inscription of the body, and argues that “once you are seriously displacing the nature/language opposition, you have to be arguing that nature, far from being written on, and insofar as it cannot be said to ‘lack language’, ‘must be articulate’ (page 90).

Elspeth Probyn (2001), on the other hand, provides a dazzling array of ways to understand skin both materially, metonymically and metaphorically – it protects and is vulnerable, it can be bruised and breached, it is porous, it expands and retracts, it devours and is devoured, it has colour, texture and sensation.

Organization studies scholars have, nonetheless, perhaps been somewhat neglectful of flesh in our various endeavours; whilst for the last three decades or so we have paid a great deal of attention to the body, we have largely overlooked flesh. Yet, as our opening epigraph implies, flesh can be connected to organization/s and organizing in manifold different ways. Possible contributions to this special issue could therefore include but are certainly not limited to:

  • The pleasures of the flesh: carnality, sensuality, excess and indulgence in, of and as provided by organizations (and their opposites).
  • ‘Fleshworkers’ – cosmetic surgeons, masseuses, cosmetic surgeons, tattooists, make-up artists, slaughterhouse workers, morticians, laboratory scientists etc. – and the markets for their services.
  • The resurging significance of the provenance of meat and fish in western eating habits and its cultural, symbolic and economic implications.
  • Vegetarianism, veganism, ‘clean’ and raw food diets, the markets around and commodification of these practices.
  • Researching the flesh, bodily, sensory, fleshly, aesthetic or sensible knowing and/ or methods, the ethics of fleshly research.  Organizing (and researching) in meatspace and virtual space, ‘in the flesh’ and online.
  • Bodily changes, wounding, scarring and dysmorphia in organizations.
  • Flesh-eaters and the undead: cannibals, vampires and zombies as organizational metaphors.
  • The organization of organ donation and the global black market in body parts.
  • The global meat industry and its manifold discontents: eg, the certification and marketing of halal meat, the UK horse meat scandal.
  • (Re)incarnation and incorporation in and of organizations.
  • Pro-ana, pro-mia and fat acceptance organizations.
  • Organizational metaphors of the flesh: eg, the ‘lean organization’, a ‘meaty question’, ‘fleshing out an argument’, a ‘meat market’, ‘dead meat’ etc.
  • The use of animal skin for clothing and furnishings and the complex global differences of necessity versus excess.
  • The ethics and politics of organizing as understood through Agamben’s zoë (bare life) and bios (qualified life) … and so on.

This list is intended to be indicative only.  Innovative interpretations of the call are encouraged.  With its long tradition of inter-disciplinary approaches, C&O invites papers that draw insights and approaches from across a range of social sciences and humanities.  In addition to scholars working in management and organization studies we welcome contributions from anthropology, sociology, philosophy, politics, art history, communication, film, gender and cultural studies. We also welcome papers from any disciplinary, paradigmatic or methodological perspective as long as they directly address the theme of flesh and organization.  

Editorial team, submission and informal enquiries

The editorial team for this special issue are: Ilaria Boncori (University of Essex), Jo Brewis (University of Leicester), Luigi Maria Sicca (University of Naples) and Charlie Smith (University of Leicester).

Please ensure that all submissions to the special issue are made via the ScholarOne Culture and Organization site at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/gsco. You will have to sign up for an account before you are able to submit a manuscript. Please ensure when you do submit that you select the relevant special issue (Volume 25, Issue 4) to direct your submission appropriately. If you experience any problems, please contact the editors of this issue.

 Style and other instructions on manuscript preparation can be found at the journal’s website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gsco20/current. Manuscript length should not exceed 8000 words, including appendices and supporting materials. Please also be aware that any images used in your submission must be your own, or where they are not, you must already have permission to reproduce them in an academic journal. You should make this explicit in the submitted manuscript.

Manuscripts must be submitted by 31st May 2018.

Prospective authors are invited to discuss manuscript ideas for the special issue with the guest editors before the deadline for submissions.  They can be reached via e-mail at: scosxxxv@gmail.com.

References

Butler, Judith. 1990. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge, Chapman and Hall.

Foucault, Michel. 1977. “Power and Sex.” Telos 32: 152-161.

Hart, Lynda. 1998. Between the Body and the Flesh: Performing Sadomasochism. Columbia University Press: New York.

Kirby, Vicki. 1997. Telling Flesh: The Substance of the Corporeal. New York: Routledge.

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. 1962. Phenomenology of Perception. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Moraga, Cherríe. 2015. “Introduction. Entering the Lives of Others: Theory in the Flesh.” In This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, edited by Cherríe Moraga and Gloria E. Anzaldúa, fourth edition, 19. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Probyn, Elspeth. 2001. “Eating Skin.” In Thinking Through the Skin, edited by Sara Ahmed and Jackie Stacey, 87-103. London: Routledge.

Strati, Antonio. 2007. “Sensible Knowledge and Practice-Based Learning.” Management Learning 38 (1): 61-77.


Item 2 – TaPRA Workshop

Reaching | Outreaching

Loughborough University London, Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

9 June 2018 

The language of ‘outreach’ shapes conversation on university and artistic life, from ‘strategic visions’ to arts council applications. But what does it mean to reach out? What is the discourse on outreach as a gesture – an act and effect?

In On Being Included, Sara Ahmed argues that institutional commitments to diversity may be considered “non-performatives”: “they do not bring into effect that which they name” (2012: 119). Institutions run diversity workshops and committees, outreach programmes and ‘participatory’ or ‘inclusive’ agendas, but where does the gesture stop, and where does it begin? How may we understand the choreography and the dramaturgy of institutional outreaching? How can we begin to detour this language so as to rethink the role of the university – and of artistic practice – in public life today? Does the university have a role to play in public life, and what might that be? Does this equate with ‘outreach’? What is the relationship between artistic practice and what may be termed ‘creative research’?

 In this day-long workshop, situated at the Olympic site of the University of Loughborough – a location like many in the ‘expanded university’ today concerned with reaching out to the ‘local community’ – the TaPRA Theatre, Performance and Philosophy working group aims to think together about choreo-geography, gesture, site, institutional politics, affect and the never-ending labour of reaching: we will ask, what does it mean to imagine a cultural and intellectual sphere from which reaching  takes place, but yet which, it seems, is never imagined to be reached towards? What colonial or imperial legacy suggests that intellectual life has for its role to bring knowledge out towards others? What might we learn from being touched in our work by those whose knowledges may not be institutionally recognised? And finally, what might be involved in thinking cultures of proximity, displacement, and spostamento – or centripetal and centrifugal displacement, reciprocal displacement, displacement that comes back to haunt one? How are we implicated in cultivating intellectual and creative spaces and ties that fail again and again to bind, to shift, or perhaps at this stage in the public life of universities – entering full throttle into a wholesale culture of privatization – to query the form of these structures of ‘outreach’ for those whose lives we are meant, in the final analysis, to ‘transform’? If public impact is meant to ‘change’ those our work comes into contact with, how do we analyse and eventually reclaim the dance, the theatre – the dramaturgy – of this contact and this encounter?
The event aims to engage participants in roundtables and curated discussions at the intersection of philosophy and practice. We are calling for reflections and provocations centred (or decentred) on the following themes in relation with theatre and performance:

  • Practices of reaching, discourses of outreach
  • Dissociation, displacement and decentring
  • Dramaturgies and choreographies of distance and proximity
  • Aporetic and porous spaces of co-habitation
  • Institutional choreopolitics
  • Decreation and deproduction; alternative models of capitalism, work and theatricality
  • Gesture, ‘community’ and constitutive alterity
  • Discourses and practices of political and institutional ‘change’
  • Cultures and pedagogies of the sited university
  • Performative (or ‘non-performative’) languages of business, enterprise, innovation and affiliation

 We invite researchers, practitioners and performance curators to submit expressions of interest in the form of proposals for position papers, curated discussions, seminars/reading groups, workshops or performative interventions.

 Postgraduate students, unaffiliated/casualised academics and independent practitioners are especially encouraged to apply, and four travel bursaries of £80 each will be made available (please indicate if you are eligible in your application).

Lunch and refreshments are included.

Please send 250-word proposals and a short bio to Fred Dalmasso (F.T.J.Dalmasso@lboro.ac.uk), Kélina Gotman (kelina.gotman@kcl.ac.uk) and Daniela Perazzo Domm (D.Perazzodomm@kingston.ac.uk) by 20 April 2018. Participants will be notified by 4 May 2018.

 The cost of this workshop is £10 (free for postgraduate students, unaffiliated/casualised academics and independent artists). Participants who are not current members of the Theatre and Performance Research Association will also be required to pay a discounted membership fee of £10.


Item 3 – CASIC Summer School

Second International CASIC Summer School

on Co-production and Community Engagement

7-9 June 2018

Community Animation and Social Innovation Centre – CASIC is pleased to announce its second exciting Summer School which will be taking place in central England at the New Vic Theatre, Newcastle-under-Lyme (7 of June) and Keele University (8-9 of June, 2018).

The Summer School will enlighten, inspire and guide ECRs and students at all stages of scholarly or professional doctorates. It will include the opportunity to experience and work with our interactive digital environment, The Health Cinema and each day will be packed with hands-on sessions addressing six broad topics:

  • Knowledge co-design and co-production
  • Cultural Animation
  • Geopoetics
  • Soundscapes
  • Somatic practice, motion capture and VR technology
  • Collaborative creative analysis

We are offering an early bird price of £260 for bookings received and paid by 30 April. After that date the price will be £300. The cost includes refreshments and lunches and a complimentary copy of Dr Kara’s book on Creative research methods.

For further information contact Liz Riley support.casic@keele.ac.uk

Bursaries Available

We are pleased to announce that we have received funding from the AHRC Northwest Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership to allow us to award up to 15 bursaries for students and early career researchers.  The bursaries will cover the course fees only, and not travel or accommodation (however, you may be able to claim these expenses from your institution’s training budget).  The bursaries are competitive – please complete this online form to apply.  The deadline is 20 April 2018 and PhD students will need to include a short statement of support from their supervisor.

Some testimonials from last year’s participants

“Most connected conference I have been to, a little community was formed by doing the different exercises which illustrates the power of play!”

“The CASIC Summer School exceeded my expectations. The different sessions were so interesting (fun even!); presenters were very experienced researchers, well-informed and everything was underpinned by theory. I came away inspired! As such, I have been encouraging colleagues and doctoral students to consider attending in the future.”

“One of the best conferences – well timed across the three days, well organised in terms of the different slots and different voices, both through the presentations but also of the other participants through the workshops.”

Further testimonials can be seen here

Speakers and facilitators include

  • Professor Mihaela Kelemen, CASIC Director, Keele Management School
  • Sue Moffat – Director of New Vic Borderlines, New Vic Theatre
  • Véronique Jochum, Head of Research, National Council for Voluntary Organisations
  • Dr. Helen Kara, independent researcher and author of Creative Research Methods in the Social Sciences: A Practical Guide.
  • Dr Ceri Morgan – English and Creative Writing, School of Humanities, Keele University
  • Professor Rajmil Fischman – Music and Music Technology, School of Humanities, Keele University
  • Dr. Lisa Dikomitis, School of Medicine and iPCHS, Keele University
  • Anna Macdonald, Dance Artist, Manchester Metropolitan University
  • Will Brearley, Music and Music Technology, School of Humanities, Keele University
  • Tom Pardoe, School of Pharmacy, Keele University
  • Dr. Emma Surman, Keele Management School
  • Dr. Lindsay Hamilton, Keele Management School

The full programme can be viewed here.

To book your place please follow this link.


Item 4 – Crafting and growing web content for www.scos.org

Have you got an idea that’s just bubbling around, or have you taken a video recently of something inspirational? SCOS would love to share your thoughts and ideas with the community through our website blog. Writing for the website would not be restricted to any particular format and could include photographs or other media. If you have something you would like to submit or if you have an idea you would like to explore, please contact Scott Lawley on scott.lawley@ntu.ac.uk or you can find us on facebook at www.facebook.com/groups/1648286865418616/ (Quick Facebook disclaimer – we don’t want your data to be misused. We are happy to welcome people on the Facebook platform who have chosen to continue to use it but we remain committed to use of the website and mailing list. As a board we will be discussing social media at the next available opportunity).

SCOS Update February 2018

Dear SCOSsers

February is here and today tiny drifting snowflakes are still passing my window. Is it the long freeze and the start of a new ice age? Likely not, as the snowdrops that I seem to only ever see planted on roundabouts and in old ladies’ gardens are happily enjoying the odd spot of sunshine in between. It seems that while I have been doing my best impersonation of a (hardworking) hibernating hermit hedgehog, however…SCOSsers around the globe have been busy! Today’s email newsletter is bursting with items to excite and affect.

Don’t forget, if you know anyone who might be interested in SCOS and wants to join the membership they just need to get in touch, so do mention us to colleagues and research students.

Item 1 ACSCOS/SCOS Conference  “Wabi-sabi (侘寂): Imperfection, incompleteness and impermanence in Organisational Life” Deadline for abstracts is 28th February

Item 2 CMS 2019 to be hosted by the Open University in collaboration with VIDA

Item 3  Job Opening at Université Saint-Paul, Canada.

Item 4 Job Opening at Essex Business School, UK

Item 5 Culture and Organization SI Carne deadline is coming up in May 2018 so get those pens working if you plan to submit!

Item 6 Free one-day Conference “Witches WAGS and Wideboys” at Essex Business School

Item 7 CfP ‘Affects & Collective Practices of the Undercommons’

Best wishes

Laura


Item 1: ACSCOS/SCOS Conference  “Wabi-sabi (侘寂): Imperfection, incompleteness and impermanence in Organisational Life”

Deadline for abstracts is 28th February and please note that there are a variety of PhD and ECR scholarships and bursaries available, including some specifically for Australasian delegates so applications are encouraged.

You can find further information on the conference website at http://scos2018.org/ or contact the organisers directly on scosacscos2018@gmail.com


Item 2: CMS 2019 to be hosted by the Open University in collaboration with VIDA

ICMS is excited to announce that the Open University led by the Department of People and Organisations and in collaboration with VIDA has been selected, from a shortlist of excellent proposals, to host the 11th International Critical Management Studies conference around the theme of “Precarious Presents, Open Futures”.

In a statement, Peter Bloom, Head of Department for ‘People and Organizations’ at the Open University said:

‘We are enthusiastic in our desire to foster discussions, papers and installations/interventions regarding what it means for societies and organisations to be “open” in the 21st century.  This includes, but it is not limited to how being open  is under attack by renewed discourses of individualized privilege and “closure”, as well as exploring what currently constitutes a radical or even revolutionary form of political, economic, historical, and ethical openness in organisations and management, and the possibilities of what this could look like in the future.

We are thus interested in critical interventions that explore timely and new concepts such as “digital inclusion”, “decolonizing data management”, “trans-human management”, “open sourced organisations”, “virtual progress”, “glocal solidarity”, and “mobile organizing”. These themes all critically interrogate the ways that technologies and emerging forms of organization can subvert established identities,  processes and practices, values/ ideals and open eup space for new and marginalised voices to shape the present and future. Just as importantly, we are committed to “opening up” how a conference is organized and managed – inviting collaborative and creative spaces for constructing knowledge sharing between academics, activists, practitioners, artists, and policy makers.’

CMS 2019 will take place at the Milton Keynes main campus of the Open University. Details including finalised dates and a conference email address and a call for streams, workshops, installations, interventions and other events will follow. In the meantime, please contact peter.bloom@open.ac.uk if you would like any further information on the CMS 2019 conference.


Item 3 : Job Opening at Université Saint-Paul, Canada.

I am a the director of Saint-Paul University’s new school of social innovation in Ottawa, Canada. We are opening a new position in management of social organization, you can find the description here. Someone with a critical management studies background would fit very well for this position, so I thought it might interest people involved in SCOS.

Simon Tremblay-Pepin

Professeur, Université Saint-Paul

Directeur de l’École d’Innovation sociale

 


Item 4: Job Opening at Essex Business School, UK

SL/R in HRM at Essex Business School

This is an exciting opportunity to join the newly established Organisation Studies and Human Resource Management (HRM) Group at Essex Business School in the field of Human Resource Management as either a Senior Lecturer or Reader.

If successful, you will be part of a team of more than 14 research active members, consisting of early and established researchers with a global reputation for their work in critical organisation studies, HRM, and equality and diversity.

We are keen to appoint a talented scholar with experience in any area of HRM. We would, however, especially welcome applications from those with expertise in:

International HRM
Strategic HRM
Human Resource Development

For further details please follow the link 


Item 5: CfP Culture and Organization Special Issue “Carne”

CARNE – Flesh and Organization

Call for papers for a special issue of culture and organization

volume 25, issue 4, 2019

“Flesh, we believe – more than bodies – is at stake in our posthuman times, in the sense that it is flesh that is subject to increased control either in the laboratory or the marketplace and is caught up in processes of modification that seek to master and profit from it.” (Diamanti et al., 2009, 4)

This call for papers takes off from the longstanding use of the notion of flesh in academic investigations of the more or less porous boundaries between the self, others and the world around us. Flesh, these works suggest, is ontologically slippery and definitionally elusive. For Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1964), flesh reconnects the viewing and the visible, the touching and the touched, the body and the world. Perception itself is a fleshly – auditory, visual, gustatory, haptic, olfactory – activity. Moreover, as Antonio Strati (2007) points out in his discussion of the connections between practice-based learning and ‘sensible knowledge’ in organizations, when we perceive others, we always perceive them as fundamentally corporeal. Equally, the world acts upon our flesh, so that what or whom we touch, see, smell, taste and hear may touch, see, smell, taste and hear us. Elsewhere, Michel Foucault locates modern western scientia sexualis as having its origins in the earliest years of Christianity and its confessional regime which seeks to unearth “the important secrets of the flesh” (1977, 154) as the deepest truths of the human subject. In this reading, flesh is the natural body, always and irrevocably bound to sin and to death.

Cherríe Moraga (2015, 19), on the other hand, identifies a theory in the flesh as “one where the physical realities of our lives – our skin color, the land or concrete we grew up on, our sexual longings – all fuse to create a politic born out of necessity”. In a very different feminist analysis, Judith Butler (1990, 96, 33) defines gender as the “styles of the flesh” which “congeal over time”; whereas Vicki Kirby (1997) takes her and other feminist poststructuralists to task in Telling Flesh for their overstatement of the cultural inscription of the body, and argues that “once you are seriously displacing the nature/language opposition, you have to be arguing that nature, far from being written on, and insofar as it cannot be said to ‘lack language’, ‘must be articulate’ (page 90). Elspeth Probyn (2001), on the other hand, provides a dazzling array of ways to understand skin both materially, metonymically and metaphorically – it protects and is vulnerable, it can be bruised and breached, it is porous, it expands and retracts, it devours and is devoured, it has colour, texture and sensation.

Organization studies scholars have, nonetheless, perhaps been somewhat neglectful of flesh in our various endeavours; whilst for the last three decades or so we have paid a great deal of attention to the body, we have largely overlooked flesh. Yet, as our opening epigraph implies, flesh can be connected to organization/s and organizing in manifold different ways. Possible contributions to this special issue could therefore include but are certainly not limited to:

  • The pleasures of the flesh: carnality, sensuality, excess and indulgence in, of and as provided by organizations (and their opposites).
  • ‘Fleshworkers’ – cosmetic surgeons, masseuses, cosmetic surgeons, tattooists, make-up artists, slaughterhouse workers, morticians, laboratory scientists etc. – and the markets for their services.
  • The resurging significance of the provenance of meat and fish in western eating habits and its cultural, symbolic and economic implications.
  • Vegetarianism, veganism, ‘clean’ and raw food diets, the markets around and commodification of these practices.
  • Researching the flesh, bodily, sensory, fleshly, aesthetic or sensible knowing and/ or methods, the ethics of fleshly research.  Organizing (and researching) in meatspace and virtual space, ‘in the flesh’ and online.
  • Bodily changes, wounding, scarring and dysmorphia in organizations.
  • Flesh-eaters and the undead: cannibals, vampires and zombies as organizational metaphors.
  • The organization of organ donation and the global black market in body parts.
  • The global meat industry and its manifold discontents: eg, the certification and marketing of halal meat, the UK horse meat scandal.
  • (Re)incarnation and incorporation in and of organizations.
  • Pro-ana, pro-mia and fat acceptance organizations.
  • Organizational metaphors of the flesh: eg, the ‘lean organization’, a ‘meaty question’, ‘fleshing out an argument’, a ‘meat market’, ‘dead meat’ etc.
  • The use of animal skin for clothing and furnishings and the complex global differences of necessity versus excess.
  • The ethics and politics of organizing as understood through Agamben’s zoë (bare life) and bios (qualified life) …and so on.

This list is intended to be indicative only.  Innovative interpretations of the call are encouraged.  With its long tradition of inter-disciplinary approaches, C&O invites papers that draw insights and approaches from across a range of social sciences and humanities.  In addition to scholars working in management and organization studies we welcome contributions from anthropology, sociology, philosophy, politics, art history, communication, film, gender and cultural studies. We also welcome papers from any disciplinary, paradigmatic or methodological perspective as long as they directly address the theme of flesh and organization.  

Editorial team, submission and informal enquiries

The editorial team for this special issue are: Ilaria Boncori (University of Essex), Jo Brewis (University of Leicester), Luigi Maria Sicca (University of Naples) and Charlie Smith (University of Leicester).

Please ensure that all submissions to the special issue are made via the ScholarOne Culture and Organization site at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/gsco. You will have to sign up for an account before you are able to submit a manuscript. Please ensure when you do submit that you select the relevant special issue (Volume 25, Issue 4) to direct your submission appropriately. If you experience any problems, please contact the editors of this issue.

Style and other instructions on manuscript preparation can be found at the journal’s website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gsco20/current. Manuscript length should not exceed 8000 words, including appendices and supporting materials. Please also be aware that any images used in your submission must be your own, or where they are not, you must already have permission to reproduce them in an academic journal. You should make this explicit in the submitted manuscript.

Manuscripts must be submitted by 31st May 2018.

Prospective authors are invited to discuss manuscript ideas for the special issue with the guest editors before the deadline for submissions.  They can be reached via e-mail at: scosxxxv@gmail.com.

References

Butler, Judith. 1990. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge, Chapman and Hall.

Foucault, Michel. 1977. “Power and Sex.” Telos 32: 152-161.

Hart, Lynda. 1998. Between the Body and the Flesh: Performing Sadomasochism. Columbia University Press: New York.

Kirby, Vicki. 1997. Telling Flesh: The Substance of the Corporeal. New York: Routledge.

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. 1962. Phenomenology of Perception. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Moraga, Cherríe. 2015. “Introduction. Entering the Lives of Others: Theory in the Flesh.” In This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, edited by Cherríe Moraga and Gloria E. Anzaldúa, fourth edition, 19. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Probyn, Elspeth. 2001. “Eating Skin.” In Thinking Through the Skin, edited by Sara Ahmed and Jackie Stacey, 87-103. London: Routledge.

Strati, Antonio. 2007. “Sensible Knowledge and Practice-Based Learning.” Management Learning 38 (1): 61-77


Item 6: Free one-day Conference “Witches WAGS and Wideboys” at Essex Business School

Dear all,

With usual apologies for cross-posting, please see below details of a one-day conference hosted by Anglia Ruskin University and University of Essex that we hope may be of interest. The focus is on the origins and implications of regional cultural stereotypes, and is being organised in association with Essex County Council and the Essex Book Festival. Places are limited so please use the link to register if you would like to join us. And please do feel free to forward the details to anyone you think might be interested.

Best wishes,

Melissa

REGISTER HERE


Item 7 : CfP Affects & Collective Practices of the Undercommons

For the affect inquiry / making space conference
August 8-11, 2018 Millersville University’s Ware Center, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
http://capaciousjournal.com/conference/

Stream Organizers: Jack Z. Bratich & Stevphen Shukaitis

What affects circulate within the undercommons today (Harney & Moten 2013)?

This stream proposes to inquire into the relation between affective spaces and aesthetics in the construction of forms of collective intelligence and subjectivities, particularly in the ways this relation is worked with to expand the commonly understood realm of political action. It will explore processes of affective composition through which fleeting and ephemeral relations and performance are involved in what George Katsiaficas describes as “engaging aesthetic rationality in the process of political transformation, of turning politics into art, everyday life into an aesthetically governed domain.” (2001: 310) This is what Nick Thoburn terms a “minor politics” (2003): one that is not based upon calling forth an already existing identity or position, but rather a politics based on a continual intensive and affective engagement of constant self-institution.

“Affects & Collective Practices of the Undercommons” proposes to explore the relation of affective relations and aesthetics in the construction and operation of formations of collective intelligence and subjectivity, particularly when these forms are brought about in a way intended to expand and modulate understood spaces for political action. These relations and their affectivity embody and express the movement of the social imaginary, or the constant process of becoming: what Raoul Vaneigem referred to as the revolution of everyday life. Everyday life and forms of political action residing in it, whether unseen or encoded in a hidden transcript, exists as a privileged location for political analysis and action precisely because it is where forms of collective intelligence, creativity, and social wealth are manifested.

The everyday manifestations and embodiments of collective imagination and intelligence through collective practices take part in the movement of this transformation of subjectivities. Forms of self-determining community and sociality, which have been understood and theorized as creating the possibility for exodus from relations of domination and the creation of other relations within the present, is premised upon working through, and extending these relations, intensities, and experiences.

“Affects & Aesthetics of the Undercommons” will explore the multiple fields and paths where these relations, intensities, and modulations of collective subjectivities are expressed and transformed through aesthetic expression and movement. This fleeting and ephemeral realm, one of both improvisation and ritual that Amendant Hardiker and Miekal And characterize as the space of the anartistic (1995) provides a unique and valuable entrance point for understanding and theorization of the relation of mind, culture, and collective imagination in constant movement.

Potential topics/possible intersections including but not limited to:
– Infrapolitics & creative subversion
– Black radicalism and genealogies
– Experimental education & nomadic pedagogy
– Creating spaces within and against institutions
– Autonomous spaces & protocols
– Study & Sociality, Convivial Research
– Infrastructure & Logisticality
– Performativy of/in the Commons

250-word paper abstracts can now be submitted to capacious@millersville.edu. The final deadline for submissions is Thursday, March 15, 2018.

 

SCOS Update December 2017

Dear Scossers

as we approach another turning point in the year, it’s also a key turning point for deadlines! So here are a few to think about…

Item 1 – Remember Rome? Deadline for the accompanying Culture and Organization SI Carne is May 2018 so get those pens working if you plan to submit! All CfPs for C&O are available here.

Item 2 – The SCOS/ACSCOS Conference 2018 on Wabi-Sabi to be held in Tokyo has extended the deadline for abstracts to February 28th 2018. More information below!

Item 3 –  EGOS 2018 stream on  Object-oriented Ontologies and Organizations Studies, deadline January 8th 2018.

Best

Laura


Item 1

The editorial team are still accepting submissions for the special issue of C&O following the Rome conference via the ScholarOne Culture and Organization site. The deadline for manuscripts is 31st May 2018. Topics include (but are not limited to):

  •  The pleasures of the flesh: carnality, sensuality, excess and indulgence in, of and as provided by organizations (and their opposites).
  • ‘Fleshworkers’ – cosmetic surgeons, masseuses, cosmetic surgeons, tattooists, make-up artists, slaughterhouse workers, morticians, laboratory scientists etc. – and the markets for their services.
  • The resurging significance of the provenance of meat and fish in western eating habits and its cultural, symbolic and economic implications.
  • Vegetarianism, veganism, ‘clean’ and raw food diets, the markets around and commodification of these practices.
  • Researching the flesh, bodily, sensory, fleshly, aesthetic or sensible knowing and/ or methods, the ethics of fleshly research.  Organizing (and researching) in meatspace and virtual space, ‘in the flesh’ and online.
  • Bodily changes, wounding, scarring and dysmorphia in organizations.
  • Flesh-eaters and the undead: cannibals, vampires and zombies as organizational metaphors.
  • The organization of organ donation and the global black market in body parts.
  • The global meat industry and its manifold discontents: eg, the certification and marketing of halal meat, the UK horse meat scandal.
  • (Re)incarnation and incorporation in and of organizations.
  • Pro-ana, pro-mia and fat acceptance organizations.
  • Organizational metaphors of the flesh: eg, the ‘lean organization’, a ‘meaty question’, ‘fleshing out an argument’, a ‘meat market’, ‘dead meat’ etc.
  • The use of animal skin for clothing and furnishings and the complex global differences of necessity versus excess.
  • The ethics and politics of organizing as understood through Agamben’s zoë (bare life) and bios (qualified life) … and so on.

You can find the full call for papers here.


Item 2 SCOS/ACSCOS 2018 “Wabi-Sabi” at Meiji University Tokyo

The deadline for abstracts to SCOS/ACSCOS 2018 has been extended to 8th February 2018!  The venue for the conference is the Academy Common Building, Surugadai Campus, Meiji University. This is in the Chiyoda district of Tokyo.

Conference Website

The conference website for SCOS/ACSCOS Japan in 2018 “Wabi-sabi” is available at http://scos2018.org with the link to registration. The deadline for submissions has been extended, and you can find the original call for papers here along with instructions for submission of abstracts: http://scos2018.org/index.php/call-for-papers/

Venue and Travel Schedule

The venue for the conference is the Academy Common Building, Surugadai Campus, Meiji University. This is in the Chiyoda district of Tokyo.

The nearest stations are Ochanomizu Station, Shin-Ochanomizu Station and Jimbochu Station. Travel to the university from Narita Airport takes approximately one hour by public transport via the Skyliner (http://www.keisei.co.jp/keisei/tetudou/skyliner/us/ae_outline/index.php), while from Haneda Airport the journey is slightly shorter on the Tokyo monorail (http://www.tokyo-monorail.co.jp/english/).

A full timetable will be made available in due course but expect conference events to kick off on the 17th August 2018 at 5pm. The board will be convening for the board meeting slightly earlier at 2pm.

The organisers have very helpful maps available here: http://scos2018.org/index.php/travel-and-accommodation/

Accommodation in Japan

Accommodation near to the campus includes a wide range of hotels, or there are also a range of apartments available through AirBnB. Some of the below have been highlighted by the organisers as conveniently located for the venue, and are suitable on a range of budgets.

Hotel Niwa Tokyo ✩✩✩✩

Official Website Tripadvisor page

This hotel was selected as one of Top 25 Hotels in Japan by TripAdvisor’s Travelers’ Choice Award 2016.

Hotel Grand Palace ✩✩✩✩

Official Website Tripadvisor Page

Hotel Metropolitan Edmont ✩✩✩✩

Official Website Tripadvisor Page

Hilltop Hotel ✩✩✩✩

Booking.com Tripadvisor Page

Hotel Villa Fontaine Jimbocho Tokyo ✩✩✩

Official Website Tripadvisor Page

Ochanomizu Hotel Shoryukan ✩✩✩

Official Website Tripadvisor Page

This hotel offers Japanese-style rooms with tatami mats and futon or conventional bedrooms.

APA Hotel Kanda Jimbocho Station East ✩✩✩

Official Website Tripadvisor Page

Tokyo Green Hotel Korakuen ✩✩✩

Tripadvisor Page Booking.com

This hotel is located near to the Tokyo Dome.

Hotel Wing International Korakuen ✩✩✩

Booking.com Tripadvisor Page

KKR Hotel Tokyo ✩✩✩

Hotels.com Tripadvisor Page

New Central Hotel ✩✩

Booking.com  Tripadvisor Page

 


Item 3 – EGOS Sub-theme 57: Object-oriented Ontologies and Organizations Studies

Convenors:
Hugo Letiche
LESI, Utrecht, The Netherlands
h.letiche@uvh.nl
Jean-Luc Moriceau
Institut Mines-Telecom/TEM, Paris, France
jean-luc.moriceau@telecom-em.eu
Geoffrey M. Lightfoot
University of Leicester, United Kingdom
g.lightfoot@le.ac.uk

Call for Papers

Surprise is causation that we did not expect or anticipate and/or could not control. In a world ever more ordered by the diktats of an increasingly imperial risk management (Martin 2007; 2015), we seem less and less able to value the unexpected. A classic example from the organization studies canon that has recently become enjoined in controversy turns around how one should best make sense of the Mann Gulch disaster that formed a key exemplar for Weick of the powers of sensemaking and the costs of its breakdown (Weick, 1993, 1996; Basbøll, 2010; Holt & Cornelissen, 2014). For recent forays back into the sources from which Weick draws reveal the potential to situate the source of the disaster not so much in any failure of ‘leadership’ on the part of the “smokejumpers’ in the face of surprising turns in the fire’s development but rather in a ‘conflagration of forces” (Maclean, 1992, cited in Basbøll, 2010), that was “neither material nor social but, simply, infernal” (Basbøll, 2010, p. 89).

Recently object-oriented-ontology (O-O-O) has proposed that objects change, assert attraction on one another, generate time and space around themselves, but never cease to exist. Graham Harman’s example is putting a match to cotton (2005). There is cotton and there is a match, then there is smoldering and smoke, and thereafter there is ash; at all moments there are objects. Objects change and retreat, are transformed and reappear as something else. There is never NO object and there is never an object that is totally given to an observer. For social constructivism, the object is in the eye of the perceiver and ‘surprise’ is a subjective quality. For O-O-O the object is only partially visible or present and always ‘strange’, uncertain and somewhat indeterminate. Weick tries to control or even banish ‘surprise’; O-O-O asserts that objects are always and can only be ‘surprising’.

Graham Harman and his co-conspirators work within a field that has come to be known as ‘speculative realism’ which has garnered increasing attention in recent years, although, as of yet, there has been little direct incursion into the administrative and organizational sciences. We hope to begin to rectify this situation with this sub-theme. Speculative realism offers potential to encounter surprise anew through a different conceptualisation of the ‘objects’ that make up our world. In Harman’s particular version of speculative realism – ‘object oriented ontology’ –, objects are always pregnant with potential to surprise for they are essentially ‘cryptic’ in their being, with much of their reality in retreat from any attempt to fully comprehend them. Objects, in this view, are made of parts and can themselves be parts of other objects. Yet despite being made up of other objects, despite unleashing surprising effects on other objects, an object has a realness that exceeds any under- or over-pinnings. The habits of thought that Harman breaks with either undermine or overmine the object qua object when they respectively seek to reduce the object to its components or see it merely as a part and nothing more than a part, of some greater whole.

The agency of objects has been typified and described by Harman as entailing multiple processes. New objects are combines of the “notes” (Harman, 2005, p. 211) or “sensual qualities” (Harman, 2011, p. 128) of their progenitors, formed when one object “allures” (Harman, 2005, p. 211) another into interaction. Interaction, which includes the intervention of the perceived ‘sensual objects’ between the limitless ‘real objects’ that are their cousins. We can only know the events of ‘vicarious causation’ (Harman, 2007) through which objects interact; the real objects themselves are too much in retreat to interact directly.

What happens if we take objects seriously, and not just as the products of enactments, in cases like Mann Gulch? What surprising landscapes and eventful circumstances would we discover? What existing organization studies concepts might be set afire?

Papers of interest to the sub-theme could consider addressing the following themes (although we in no sense see this as an exclusive or exhaustive list of the possibilities):
What are the implications for risk management of taking objects seriously (in the Harmanian sense)? How, for example, are the objects of (high) finance and more pedestrian concerns such as human shelter, related?
If organizations (seen as objects) mutate and change, but never end, should they be seen as without telos but only as processes?
How do accounts and accountability (really) relate to the objects that they claim to survey? What can we say of the objects of strategy, policy, plans and operations if all objects are partially seen and incompletely perceived?
If all perception is tentative and limited is surprise still surprising? Does event differ from surprise?
W(h)ither ethics in an object oriented world whose ‘flat ontology’ significantly problematizes an easy attribution of agency? How do we orient to ethics when we struggle with constant surprise?

References

Basbøll, T. (2010): “Multiple failures of scholarship: Karl Weick and the Mann Gulch disaster.” In: P. Armstrong & G. Lightfoot (eds.): The Leading Journal in the Field: Destabilising Authority in the Social Sciences of Management. London: Mayfly, 85–102.
Harman, G. (2005): Guerilla Metaphysics. Chicago: Open Court Books.
Harman, G. (2007): “On Vicarious Causation.” In: R. Mackay (ed.): Collapse II: Speculative Realism. Falmouth: Urbanomic, 187–221.
Harman, G. (2011): The Quadruple Object. Winchester: Zero Books.
Holt, R., & Cornelissen, J. (2014): “Sensemaking revisited.” Management Learning, 45 (5), 525–539.
Maclean, N. (1992): Young Men and Fires. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Martin, R. (2007): An Empire of Indifference: American War and the Financial Logic of Risk Management. London: Duke University Press.
Martin, R. (2015): Knowledge LTD. Toward a Social Logic of the Derivative. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
Weick, K. (1993): “The collapse of sensemaking in organizations: The Mann Gulch disaster.” Administrative Science Quarterly, 38 (4), 628–652.
Weick, K. (1996): “Drop your tools: an allegory for organization studies.” Administrative Science Quarterly, 41 (2), 301–313.

 

Quickie SCOS Update (November 2017)

Dear Scossers,

I’m a mobile-in-transit academic today but there are a few items that have come through recently which might pique your curiosity.

Item 1:Have you seen this SI from Management Learning on sensory knowledge? Antonio recommends it!

Item 2:You can’t have missed that GWO will be in Sydney in the coming year. Write differently!

Item 3:Don’t forget the upcoming deadlines for C&O Special Issues including ‘Carne’ from Rome 2017 in May 2018!

Arrivederci

Laura 


Item 1. Have you seen this SI from Management Learning on sensory knowledge? Antonio recommends it!

Dear Scos folks

still interested in Aesthetics, flesh and sensible knowledge? Well, there is a Virtual Special Issue of the journal “Management Learning”, edited by Alexia Panayiotou, that will be available online – open access 30 days.

a Virtual Special Issue of the journal on sensory knowledge. The Virtual Special Issue contains six other articles that we believe illustrate the finest work on sensory knowledge that has been published in the journal in the least ten years. All of the articles in the Virtual Special Issue are open access for the next 30 days.

The Virtual Special Issue is available here:

http://journals.sagepub.com/page/mlq/collections/virtual-special-issues/sensory_knowledge

I must warn you that this Virtual SI has a bias: one of my writing is included.

But apart from that …

all the best

Antonio Strati


Item 2: You can’t have missed that GWO will be in Sydney in the coming year. Write differently! (see attachment)

Dear SCOSers and (feminist) writers,

Jenny Helin, Carl Rhodes, Benedikte Borgstrom and I are convening a stream at GWO on Changing Writing/Writing for Change. We have had some wonderful submissions and the deadline has been extended to November 15th. If you are thinking of coming to GWO, consider picking up your pen and writing an abstract to trouble the masculine hegemonic way of writing in our academy. We aim to create an insurgent, unstoppable (feminine) flowing in Darling Harbour, come and join us…

best

Katie
katiebeavan1@gmail.com
+ 1 203 400 3167


Item 3: Don’t forget the upcoming deadlines for C&O Special Issues including ‘Carne’ from Rome 2017 in May 2018!

All Special Issue Calls here: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=specialIssues&journalCode=gsco20

A reminder of this call, with the standard apologies for cross-postings, everyone

CARNE – Flesh and Organization

Call for papers for a special issue of culture and organization

volume 25, issue 4, 2019

“Flesh, we believe – more than bodies – is at stake in our posthuman times, in the sense that it is flesh that is subject to increased control either in the laboratory or the marketplace and is caught up in processes of modification that seek to master and profit from it.” (Diamanti et al., 2009, 4)

This call for papers takes off from the longstanding use of the notion of flesh in academic investigations of the more or less porous boundaries between the self, others and the world around us. Flesh, these works suggest, is ontologically slippery and definitionally elusive. For Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1964), flesh reconnects the viewing and the visible, the touching and the touched, the body and the world. Perception itself is a fleshly – auditory, visual, gustatory, haptic, olfactory – activity. Moreover, as Antonio Strati (2007) points out in his discussion of the connections between practice-based learning and ‘sensible knowledge’ in organizations, when we perceive others, we always perceive them as fundamentally corporeal. Equally, the world acts upon our flesh, so that what or whom we touch, see, smell, taste and hear may touch, see, smell, taste and hear us. Elsewhere, Michel Foucault locates modern western scientia sexualis as having its origins in the earliest years of Christianity and its confessional regime which seeks to unearth “the important secrets of the flesh” (1977, 154) as the deepest truths of the human subject. In this reading, flesh is the natural body, always and irrevocably bound to sin and to death.

Cherríe Moraga (2015, 19), on the other hand, identifies a theory in the flesh as “one where the physical realities of our lives – our skin color, the land or concrete we grew up on, our sexual longings – all fuse to create a politic born out of necessity”. In a very different feminist analysis, Judith Butler (1990, 96, 33) defines gender as the “styles of the flesh” which “congeal over time”; whereas Vicki Kirby (1997) takes her and other feminist poststructuralists to task in Telling Flesh for their overstatement of the cultural inscription of the body, and argues that “once you are seriously displacing the nature/language opposition, you have to be arguing that nature, far from being written on, and insofar as it cannot be said to ‘lack language’, ‘must be articulate’ (page 90).

Elspeth Probyn (2001), on the other hand, provides a dazzling array of ways to understand skin both materially, metonymically and metaphorically – it protects and is vulnerable, it can be bruised and breached, it is porous, it expands and retracts, it devours and is devoured, it has colour, texture and sensation.

Organization studies scholars have, nonetheless, perhaps been somewhat neglectful of flesh in our various endeavours; whilst for the last three decades or so we have paid a great deal of attention to the body, we have largely overlooked flesh. Yet, as our opening epigraph implies, flesh can be connected to organization/s and organizing in manifold different ways. Possible contributions to this special issue could therefore include but are certainly not limited to:

  • The pleasures of the flesh: carnality, sensuality, excess and indulgence in, of and as provided by organizations (and their opposites).
  • ‘Fleshworkers’ – cosmetic surgeons, masseuses, cosmetic surgeons, tattooists, make-up artists, slaughterhouse workers, morticians, laboratory scientists etc. – and the markets for their services.
  • The resurging significance of the provenance of meat and fish in western eating habits and its cultural, symbolic and economic implications.
  • Vegetarianism, veganism, ‘clean’ and raw food diets, the markets around and commodification of these practices.
  • Researching the flesh, bodily, sensory, fleshly, aesthetic or sensible knowing and/ or methods, the ethics of fleshly research.  Organizing (and researching) in meatspace and virtual space, ‘in the flesh’ and online.
  • Bodily changes, wounding, scarring and dysmorphia in organizations.
  • Flesh-eaters and the undead: cannibals, vampires and zombies as organizational metaphors.
  • The organization of organ donation and the global black market in body parts.
  • The global meat industry and its manifold discontents: eg, the certification and marketing of halal meat, the UK horse meat scandal.
  • (Re)incarnation and incorporation in and of organizations.
  • Pro-ana, pro-mia and fat acceptance organizations.
  • Organizational metaphors of the flesh: eg, the ‘lean organization’, a ‘meaty question’, ‘fleshing out an argument’, a ‘meat market’, ‘dead meat’ etc.
  • The use of animal skin for clothing and furnishings and the complex global differences of necessity versus excess.
  • The ethics and politics of organizing as understood through Agamben’s zoë (bare life) and bios (qualified life) …and so on.

 

This list is intended to be indicative only.  Innovative interpretations of the call are encouraged.  With its long tradition of inter-disciplinary approaches, C&O invites papers that draw insights and approaches from across a range of social sciences and humanities.  In addition to scholars working in management and organization studies we welcome contributions from anthropology, sociology, philosophy, politics, art history, communication, film, gender and cultural studies. We also welcome papers from any disciplinary, paradigmatic or methodological perspective as long as they directly address the theme of flesh and organization.  

Editorial team, submission and informal enquiries

The editorial team for this special issue are: Ilaria Boncori (University of Essex), Jo Brewis (University of Leicester), Luigi Maria Sicca (University of Naples) and Charlie Smith (University of Leicester).

Please ensure that all submissions to the special issue are made via the ScholarOne Culture and Organization site at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/gsco. You will have to sign up for an account before you are able to submit a manuscript. Please ensure when you do submit that you select the relevant special issue (Volume 25, Issue 4) to direct your submission appropriately. If you experience any problems, please contact the editors of this issue.

Style and other instructions on manuscript preparation can be found at the journal’s website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gsco20/current. Manuscript length should not exceed 8000 words, including appendices and supporting materials. Please also be aware that any images used in your submission must be your own, or where they are not, you must already have permission to reproduce them in an academic journal. You should make this explicit in the submitted manuscript.

Manuscripts must be submitted by 31st May 2018.

Prospective authors are invited to discuss manuscript ideas for the special issue with the guest editors before the deadline for submissions.  They can be reached via e-mail at: scosxxxv@gmail.com.

 

References

 

Butler, Judith. 1990. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge, Chapman and Hall.

Foucault, Michel. 1977. “Power and Sex.” Telos 32: 152-161.

Hart, Lynda. 1998. Between the Body and the Flesh: Performing Sadomasochism. Columbia University Press: New York.

Kirby, Vicki. 1997. Telling Flesh: The Substance of the Corporeal. New York: Routledge.

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. 1962. Phenomenology of Perception. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Moraga, Cherríe. 2015. “Introduction. Entering the Lives of Others: Theory in the Flesh.” In This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, edited by Cherríe Moraga and Gloria E. Anzaldúa, fourth edition, 19. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Probyn, Elspeth. 2001. “Eating Skin.” In Thinking Through the Skin, edited by Sara Ahmed and Jackie Stacey, 87-103. London: Routledge.

Strati, Antonio. 2007. “Sensible Knowledge and Practice-Based Learning.” Management Learning 38 (1): 61-77.